Elliott School of International Affairs

Dean R. E. Brigety II (effective October 2015), H. Agnew (Interim)
Associate Deans H. Agnew, L. Stephenson, H. Harrison

The Elliott School of International Affairs offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare individuals to understand and work in an increasingly globalized world. The historical roots of the Elliott School extend back to the establishment of the School of Comparative Jurisprudence and Diplomacy in 1898. In 1966, the School separated from the School of Government, Business, and International Affairs to become an independent unit, the School of Public and International Affairs. In 1987, the name was changed to the School of International Affairs, and in 1988 the School was renamed in honor of Evelyn E. and Lloyd H. Elliott. Lloyd Elliott was the president of George Washington University from 1965 to 1988.

The Elliott School offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in international affairs, Asian studies, Latin American and hemispheric studies, and Middle East studies. The School offers the Master of Arts degree in the fields of international affairs, Asian studies, European and Eurasian studies, global communication, international development studies, international science and technology policy, international trade and investment policy, Latin American and hemispheric studies, Middle East studies, and security policy studies; the Master of International Policy and Practice degree for mid-career professionals; and the Master of International Studies degree for students enrolled in master’s degree programs at international universities with which the Elliott School has a special partnership.

These programs provide advanced academic and professional training in international affairs as preparation for employment in public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Focusing on major historical and contemporary issues in international affairs, the programs are both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, combining courses offered through the School with courses offered by other schools and departments of the University.


Undergraduate Degree Requirements and Policies

Academic Standing — To earn a bachelor’s degree, students must complete 120 credits, meet the University General Education Requirement, and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. Courses in lifestyle, sport, and physical activity do not count toward the degree; some ROTC classes are also excluded. Rules governing Academic Standing are applicable to students enrolled for a full-time program (12 credits or more) during the fall or spring semester. 

Scholarship Performance in the Major — All courses indicated as requirements for the major, including courses taken to fulfill the third-year language proficiency requirement, must be completed with a minimum grade of C. If a student receives a grade of D+, D, or D in any of these courses, the credit will count toward the degree, but the student must either repeat the course or, with approval of the academic advisor, substitute another course; in either case, the student must earn a minimum grade of C. If the student must repeat the course, credit for the repetition does not count toward the degree, and grades for both the initial course and the repeated course are used to compute the GPA. If the Office of Academic Advising and Student Services allows another course to be substituted, the initial course is considered to be an elective. Students are expected to consult the Office of Academic Advising and Student Services in all matters affecting the program of study, such as changes, substitutions, withdrawals, or transfer of credit from other institutions. 

Incompletes — Conditions under which the symbol I (Incomplete) may be assigned are described under University Regulations. Incomplete course work must be completed no later than one calendar year from the last day of the examination period of the semester or summer session in which the indication of I was assigned. When work for the course is complete, the I will be replaced by the grade earned. An indication of I that is not changed within this period automatically becomes an IF. The I cannot be changed by reregistering for the course at GW or by taking its equivalent elsewhere. In cases of well-documented extenuating circumstances, the instructor and student may jointly petition the Office of Academic Advising for additional time in which to complete the work of the course. Such petitions should be submitted within a year of the assignment of the I. Students are not permitted to register for any additional course work if they have more than two Incompletes on their record. 

Pass/No Pass Option — A student who has a cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 or better may, with the approval of the Office of Academic Advising, take one course per semester and receive a grade of Pass, P, or No Pass, NP, which will be recorded on the student’s transcript but will not be reflected in the cumulative grade average. A student must sign up for such an option at the Office of Academic Advising within the first eight weeks of classes. Under no circumstances may a student change from P/NP status to graded status, or vice versa, after the end of the eighth week of the semester. Foreign language courses and required courses in the student’s degree program (except those in which the grade of P or NP is normally assigned) may not be taken on a P/NP basis. Freshmen may not elect to take a course on a P/NP basis. A transfer student may not elect to take a course on a P/NP basis until the second semester of enrollment in the University. No more than six courses in which the grade of P or NP is assigned will apply toward the degree, including courses in which the grade of P or NP is normally given.

Study Abroad — Students are encouraged to study abroad. Those wishing to study abroad must consult their academic advisor and the University’s Office for Study Abroad. A maximum of 34 credits may be transferred in from other institutions’ study abroad programs. Credits for courses taken abroad through GW Study Centers and GW Summer Abroad do not apply to this maximum. Students must secure prior approval from the Office of Academic Advising for any plan of study abroad in order for the credit to apply toward the student’s degree requirements. Students must apply to a program from the University’s list of approved study abroad programs. A catalogue or other description of the study abroad program must be presented for consideration together with detailed descriptions of the courses to be taken. Visit the Office for Study Abroad website for more information.

Internships — Internships offer students the opportunity to make practical use of the knowledge they acquire in the classroom. Undergraduates who have completed at least 30 credits and have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.5 are eligible to arrange internships for credit, to a total maximum of 6 credits toward the degree. Transfer students are not eligible to arrange internships for credit until their second semester at GW. Academic work in the field of the internship is required. A zero-credit internship, which requires no additional academic work outside of the internship itself, is also available. Internships are available in the private, nonprofit, and public sectors. Students must register for internships (even if for zero credit) through the Office of Academic Advising but are responsible for locating their own internships; listings are posted at gwired.gwu.edu/career.

Double Majors — Students who complete the requirements of two majors in the Elliott School (such as international affairs and Asian studies) may graduate with a double major. Consult the Office of Academic Advising to officially declare both majors on the appropriate form.

Students in the Elliott School may take a second major offered by Columbian College of Arts and Sciences (majors in communication, English and creative writing are excluded), or the School of Engineering and Applied Science or School of Business (finance major only) . Permission for the second major must be obtained from the appropriate administrative office of the other school.

Students in Columbian College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Science may take a second major in the Elliott School. Students wishing to pursue these options must request approval through the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising. Students must complete all degree requirements for their major in their home school in order to graduate with a second major from the other school.

In all cases, double majors do not result in two degrees. See Double Majors and Double Degrees under University Regulations.

Special Honors — Students who complete a senior thesis or research seminar with a grade of A- or higher, earn a cumulative GPA of 3.7, and complete 60 credit hours in residence at GW will be awarded Special Honors. 


Graduate Degree Requirements 

Scholarship Requirements

Information on grades and computing the grade-point average is under University Regulations. Courses taken to satisfy degree requirements cannot be taken on a CR/NC basis, with the exception of some capstone courses.

Graduate students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0. A student whose grade-point average falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade of F in a course at any point after completing 9 credits is placed on academic probation. This probation extends through the period in which the student next attempts up to 12 credits of work, including prescribed courses. The student’s academic advisor will meet with the program director and/or academic dean to review the student’s record. The student’s account will be put on hold until the student has met with the program director and/or academic dean to discuss the terms of probation. A student’s program may be restricted by the program director if deemed necessary.

During the probation period, the student’s performance will be monitored to determine suitability for continued study. The Office of Academic Advising and Student Services will inform the program director and/or academic dean if the student is no longer on probation or is eligible for dismissal. Incomplete grades are not allowed during the probation period and are grounds for dismissal. A student who fails to raise the cumulative grade-point average to 3.0 or above by the end of the period of probation or who is subject to probation for a second time at any point during the academic program is eligible for dismissal. If a student is eligible for dismissal, the academic dean in consultation with the program director will decide whether the student is to be dismissed from the Elliott School. 

Readmission

A graduate student who has not been continuously enrolled or on approved leave of absence must file an application for readmission the semester before planning to return to school. 

General Requirements for Master of Arts Degree Programs

Programs leading to the Master of Arts degree require a minimum of 40 credits of graduate course work and include a thesis option. Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts are required to submit a plan of study (fields, supporting course work, etc., as endorsed by the program director) to the Office of Academic Advising and Student Services for final approval by the end of the first semester in residence. Master’s degrees are awarded after the student has completed the required course work and an acceptable thesis (if one is elected) and has satisfied the foreign language requirement (if required). 

Students with sufficient academic background may waive a core course with approval of a designated faculty member from the department concerned. A course waiver does not reduce the number of credits required for the degree. Under special circumstances, upper-level undergraduate courses may be counted toward the master’s degree when registration for graduate credit has been approved at the beginning of the course by the program director, the instructor, and the Office of Academic Advising and Student Services. The student who takes an undergraduate course for graduate credit is expected, by arrangement with the instructor, to do work at the graduate level in addition to the regular work of the course. Normally, no more than 9 credits of approved undergraduate course work may be taken for credit toward a graduate degree. Academic credit counted toward a previous degree may not be counted toward the master’s degree. 

All master’s degree candidates must complete degree requirements within five years of their admission to the program. Students who are unable temporarily to continue their studies may request a leave of absence not to exceed one year. Extensions beyond the five-year period may be granted in exceptional circumstances, but the student will be required to register for Leave of Absence each semester. 

Students are encouraged (and in some cases required) to take professional skills-based courses (IAFF 6502 Professional Skills IIAFF 6503 Professional Skills II) and should consult their program guidelines for limits on the number of credits in these courses that can count toward their degree program. The maximum allowed by the Elliott School is 4 credits. 

No more than a combined total of 6 graduate credits may be transferred from other accredited institutions or from non-degree status; these may be accepted only under limited conditions of time, grades, and relevance to the student’s program. Foreign language course credit is not eligible for transfer. 

Foreign Language Requirements

In most degree programs, a candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must demonstrate reading and speaking proficiency in a modern foreign language. All students in regional programs (including those who are not native speakers of English) must demonstrate proficiency in a language appropriate to the study of the specific region. Students should consult their program guidelines for specific requirements, academic credit, and options for fulfilling the language requirement. 

Capstone/Thesis Option

Every student must successfully complete a capstone or, with approval of the program director, a thesis near the conclusion of the master’s program. For the capstone, the student must have a 3.0 grade-point average and must have completed or registered for 30 credits. If there is a lapse of time between completion of other course work and the capstone, the student must be continuously enrolled during this period. A student who fails to complete successfully the capstone may repeat it with the permission of the dean. If the student fails a second time, no further opportunity to complete the capstone will be permitted and the degree will not be conferred. Details concerning the capstone course vary across programs; students should consult their program guidelines for details.

For most programs, exceptional students may write a thesis if they qualify by having a minimum 3.5 grade-point average for at least 20 credits of course work in their program and developing a formal thesis proposal approved by their prospective thesis advisor and the program director.

The thesis subject should be selected as early as possible so as to permit effective integration with the student’s course work. A student will not be permitted to register for (IAFF 6998 ThesisIAFF 6999 Thesis) until the thesis subject has been formally submitted to the Office of Academic Advising. The subject must be approved by the member of the full-time faculty under whom the thesis is to be written, a second member of the faculty who will serve as a reader, and the student’s program director. The thesis in its final form must have the approval of the thesis director and one other reader. All theses must be submitted electronically by May 1 prior to the student's final academic year and meet the formatting and other requirements set forth at  GW's Electronic Theses and Dissertations Submission website.

Payment of tuition for thesis research entitles the candidate, during the period of registration, to the advice and direction of the thesis director and the other reader. In case a thesis is unfinished, the student must maintain continuous enrollment and is allowed one calendar year to complete it. If the preparation of the thesis extends beyond the additional calendar year, the student must register for the entire 6 credits of thesis again and pay tuition as for a repeated course.

The Elliott School of International Affairs offers a series of graduate certificates covering topics of specialized interest. The certificate programs are open to all graduate students presently enrolled in the Elliott School, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, School of Business, and Milken Institute School of Public Health. The programs are also open to graduate students from other universities, individuals who have already earned a graduate degree, and individuals with a bachelor’s degree and a minimum of eight years of relevant professional work experience. Applicants who have less than eight years of work experience are eligible to apply but must submit the same application materials required of other M.A. degree programs. Transfer credit from non-GW institutions is not accepted into any graduate certificate program. No more than 6 credits of graduate course work taken in any degree or non-degree status within the University, including the Elliott School, may be included in any graduate certificate program. Additional information is available in the Elliott School Graduate Admissions office.

Graduate certificate programs

University Professors M. Barnett, L.A. Etzioni, M. Finnemore, B. Wood

Professors H.L. Agnew, H.G. Askari, M.A. Atkin, W.H. Becker, E. Berkowitz, S. Biddle, A. Black (Research), B.L. Boulier, M.D. Bradley, J. Brinkerhoff, A. Brooks, M.E. Brown, N.J. Brown, J. Chaves, B. Chiswick, J.J. Cordes, W.K. Cummings, H.J. Davis, C.J. Deering, B.J. Dickson, P. Ehrenfreund (Research), R. Eisen, R.M. Entman, H.B. Feigenbaum, J. Ferrer (Research), C. Fink (Practice), J. Foster, L. Fuerth (Research), C. Glaser, E.W. Gnehm, R. Grinker, S. Hamano, J. Hershberg, G. Kaminsky, D.K. Kennedy Jr., Y.K. Kim-Renaud, P.F. Klarén, J. Kuipers, M. Laruelle (Research), J.H. Lebovic, S. Livingston, M. Lynch, R. Maguire (Practice), M. Marquardt, C. McClintock, B.D. Miller, M.O. Moore, H.R. Nau, D. Ollapally (Research), S. Pace (Practice), J. Pelzman, J.M. Post, M. Price, S. Rehman, W. Reich, L.P. Ribuffo, F. Robles, P. Rollberg, R.W. Rycroft, S. Sell, F. Sesno, D. Shambaugh,J. Shambaugh, J. Sherry, S.C. Smith, M. Sodaro, R.H. Spector, R. Steinhardt, R. Sutter (Practice), R. Thornton, N.S. Vonortas, P. Wahlbeck, S. Waisman, R. Weiner, S. Wolchik, H. Wolman, J. Yang, A.M. Yezer, A. Zimmerman

Associate Professors S. Aaronson (Research), S. Aday, M. Atia, M. Ayyagari, S. Balla, H. Berry, J. Blomster, N. Blyden, A. Bowie, G. Brazinsky, Y. Captain, P. Carrillo, E. Chacko, M.X. Chen, R.W. Click, I. Creppell, A.S. Dent, A. Downes, M. Edberg, D.S. Eglitis, M. Esseesy, H.J. Farrell, I. Feldman, A. Fostel, M. Gonglewski, D.A. Grier, H.E. Hale, B. Hopkins, H.M. Harrison, D. Khoury, M. King, S. Lubkemann, M. McAlister, E.A. McCord, S. McHale, M. Mochizuki, K. Morgan, B. Orttung, D.R. Rain, L.A. Riddle, S. Roberts (Practice), R. Robin, S. Robinson, R.M. Samaniego, J. Spear, J. Spencer, M.B. Stein, S. Suranovic, A.Swaine, E.J. Teitelbaum, C. Welt, P.D. Williams, J.H. Williams, D. Yang, P.N. Zhang, 

Assistant Professors C. Arrington, E. Aviv, P. Bardet, W. Chen, T. Christov, J.F. Daniel, M. Danielson, L. Engel, E. Finkel, E. Grynasviski, I.L. Hanami, L. Hughes, S. Jandhyala, R. Jedwab, S. Kaplan, M. Kelso, J. Kim, R. Lucea, C. Mylonas, E. Saunders, D. Shaw, R.J. Shepherd, T. Sinclair, Z. Szajnfarber, C. Talmadge, O. Timoshenko, E. Uretsky, A. Ziegfeld

Explanation of Course Numbers

  • Courses in the 1000s are primarily introductory undergraduate courses
  • Those in the 2000–4000s are upper-division undergraduate courses that can also be taken for graduate credit with permission and additional work
  • Those in the 6000s and 8000s are for master’s, doctoral, and professional-level students
  • The 6000s are open to advanced undergraduate students with approval of the instructor and the dean or advising office

IAFF 1005. Introduction to International Affairs: A Washington Perspective. 4 Credits.

Open only to first-year students in the Elliott School. An introduction to the study of international affairs, integrating material designed to orient students to the Elliott School, the University, and the city of Washington. Students who have transferred into the Elliott School should take PSC 1003 instead of this course. Credit may not be earned for both IAFF 1005 and PSC 1003.

IAFF 2040. Basic Topics in International Affairs. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Primarily for Elliott School freshmen and sophomores.

IAFF 2090. Latin America: Problems and Promise. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary course in Latin American studies designed to introduce undergraduates to the diverse, rich, and complex history, politics, economy, culture, and society of Latin America.

IAFF 2091. East Asia-Past and Present. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary course offering a comprehensive and integrated introduction to the civilizations and present problems of East Asia.

IAFF 2092. Russia and Eastern Europe: An Introduction. 3 Credits.

A multidisciplinary introduction to the lands and cultures of the former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe. The main emphasis is on history and politics, with attention also given to economics, trade, geography, military matters, literature, and the media.

IAFF 2093. Africa: Problems and Prospects. 3 Credits.

Aspects of the environment, culture, and politics as they affect the present and anticipated future of Africa.

IAFF 2094. Europe: International and Domestic Interactions. 3 Credits.

A multidisciplinary view of contemporary Europe, including the E.U. states, other states of Eastern Europe, and Turkey. The widening processes of political, judicial, economic, cultural, and security integration. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005, PSC 1001.

IAFF 2190. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

IAFF 2190W. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

IAFF 3155. Spain in the Modern World. 3 Credits.

IAFF 3171. U.S. Foreign Policy Summer Program. 3-4 Credits.

The institutions and ideas that shape U.S. foreign policy, including the U.S. Congress and administration, foreign embassies, international organizations, think tanks, interest groups, and media outlets. A separate section of the course covers issues of reporting on foreign policy issues. The program has special admission criteria.

IAFF 3179. Special Topics in Science and Technology Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3180. Special Topics in Security Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3180W. Spec Topics in Security Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3181. Special Topics in Conflict Resolution. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3182. Special Topics in Foreign Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3183. Special Topics in Development Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3184. Special Topics in Trade and International Economic Policy. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3185. Special Topics in European and Eurasian Studies. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3186. Special Topics in Asian Studies. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3186W. SpecialTopics in Asian Studies. 0-3 Credits.

IAFF 3187. Special Topics in Latin American and Hemispheric Studies. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3188. Special Topics in Middle East Studies. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3189. Special Topics in African Studies. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3190. Special Topics in International Affairs. 0-3 Credits.

The course may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite: IAFF 1005 or PSC 1003; junior or senior standing.

IAFF 3190W. Special Topics. 0-3 Credits.

IAFF 3192. ESIA Undergraduate Scholars Workshop. 1 Credit.

For Elliott School juniors and seniors who have applied to and been accepted into the ESIA Undergraduate Scholars Program. Students fine-tune their research questions, conduct the bulk of their research, draft abstracts, and outline their papers. See http://elliott.gwu.edu/academics/ugrad/scholars/index.cfm for more information.

IAFF 3193W. ESIA UG Scholars Course. 3 Credits.

IAFF 3195. Internship. 0-3 Credits.

Internships in public, private, and nonprofit organizations concerned with international affairs. Students must meet selection criteria, find a sponsoring faculty member, and receive approval from the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising and Student Services. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with permission.

IAFF 3198. Independent Study and Research. 1-3 Credits.

For juniors and seniors with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0. Students must find a sponsoring faculty member and receive approval from the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising and Student Services. May be repeated for credit with permission of the dean.

IAFF 4191. Senior Seminar. 3 Credits.

For Elliott School seniors only. Intensive readings, discussion, research, and writing. Students must meet selection criteria and receive approval from the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising and Student Services.

IAFF 4191W. Senior Seminar. 3 Credits.

For Elliott School seniors only. Intensive readings, discussion, research, and writing. Students must meet selection criteria and receive approval from the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising and Student Services.

IAFF 4199. Senior Thesis. 3 Credits.

For Elliott School seniors only. Students must meet selection criteria, find a sponsoring faculty member, and receive approval from the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising and Student Services.

IAFF 5700. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

IAFF 6101. IA Cornerstone. 3 Credits.

Political, economic, and social theories of international relations and their applications to practice.

IAFF 6102. Global Gender Policy. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary and comparative approach to examination of policies targeted at achieving gender equality and of the costs of policies that are not gender-specific. Topics include poverty reduction, environmental sustainability, social justice, global and personal security, and prevention of and responses to extreme calamities and crises. How global gender policies are rationalized, adopted, implemented, and assessed. Focus on "what works" and why it works; gaps that remain in achieving global gender equality.

IAFF 6106. Nuclear Weapons. 3 Credits.

The technology and politics associated with nuclear weapons. Strategy and deterrence, force planning and operations, and the prospect of nuclear terrorism.

IAFF 6118. Special Topics in International Affairs. 3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6121. International Development Studies Cornerstone. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the concepts and methods of international development. Open only to M.A. candidates in international development studies.

IAFF 6122. Development Policy and Practice. 3 Credits.

An overview of economic development in developing countries; key challenges of economic growth, poverty alleviation, and development.

IAFF 6136. Gender and Development. 3 Credits.

Theoretical approaches to gender and development and debates over how to promote gender equity and rights across the gender spectrum. Key issues in gender and development and the range of actors who are involved in promoting gender equality. General patterns, lessons with broader applications, and challenges and differences within and between societies.

IAFF 6137. Development Studies Pre-Capstone Workshop. 1 Credit.

Students work in teams to find a suitable client and negotiate a project, with detailed terms of reference and a work plan to be carried out in the spring semester. Open only to M.A. candidates in international development studies.

IAFF 6138. Special Topics in International Development Studies. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6139. International Development Studies Capstone. 3 Credits.

A project-oriented development course abroad, designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in international development studies.

IAFF 6141. International Science and Technology Policy Cornerstone. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the study of international science and technology policy; focus on policy issues that arise from interactions between scientific and technological developments and government activity.

IAFF 6142. Technology Creation/Diffusion. 3 Credits.

Examination of the relationship between invention (inception), innovation (first application), and dissemination (diffusion) of technological knowledge; focus on the technological environment prevailing in the major developed market economies.

IAFF 6145. U.S. Space Policy. 3 Credits.

Origins, evolution, current status, and future prospects of U.S. space policies and programs. U.S. civilian, military, and national security space programs and space activities of the U.S. private sector.

IAFF 6146. Space Law. 3 Credits.

The underlying principles of international space law, with emphasis on issues of particular concern as the uses of space increase for exploration, commerce, and security.

IAFF 6148. Special Topics in Space Policy. 3 Credits.

Topic announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6151. Environmental Policy. 3 Credits.

Examination of public policies designed to protect the human and physical environment; focus on the ways science and technology can simultaneously create new environmental problems and contribute to their mitigation and prevention.

IAFF 6153. Science, Technology, and National Security. 3 Credits.

The contributions of science and technology to U.S. security in military, intelligence, and homeland security activities.

IAFF 6158. Special Topics in International Science and Technology Policy. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6159. ISTP Capstone Project. 3 Credits.

A seminar designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in science and technology policy.

IAFF 6160. Defense Policy and Program Analysis. 3 Credits.

Examination of how national security policy is formulated and translated into a defense budget, program priorities, and force structure. Focus on nuclear forces.

IAFF 6163. Transnational Security. 3 Credits.

Overview of security concerns that transcend state borders, including terrorism, drug trafficking, organized crime, weapons proliferation, migration, and environmental degradation.

IAFF 6165. Fundamentals of Intelligence. 3 Credits.

The institutional structure of the intelligence community; the intelligence production cycle, including tasking, collection, analysis, covert action, and counterintelligence; and relations between the intelligence and policy communities.

IAFF 6167. DefensePolicy&ProgAnalysis II. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the development of national security policy and analytic techniques to derive a defense program and force structure from it. Special attention to general-purpose forces.

IAFF 6169. Homeland Security. 3 Credits.

The central missions of a homeland security agency: domestic security, emergency preparedness, technology policy, timely intelligence, counterintelligence, and preemptive actions. How the U.S. has dealt historically with internal security matters; contemporary approaches to security problems.

IAFF 6171. Introduction to Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

Interstate disputes, contemporary civil wars, complex political emergencies, and other forms of organized violence.

IAFF 6173. Security and Development. 3 Credits.

Consideration of the relationship between security and development reflecting the growing interest from the security field in issues that have traditionally been the purview of development, and vice versa.

IAFF 6186. Special Topics in Security Policy Studies. 3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6189. Security Policy Studies Capstone. 3 Credits.

A project-oriented course, designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in security policy studies.

IAFF 6198. Special Topics in International Trade and Investment Policy. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6199. International Trade and Investment Policy Capstone. 1 Credit.

A project-oriented course, designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in international trade and investment policy.

IAFF 6208. Special Topics in Global Communication. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6209. Global Communication Capstone. 3 Credits.

A project-oriented course, designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in global communication.

IAFF 6211. MIPP Practicum. 3 Credits.

For Master of International Policy and Practice degree candidates only.

IAFF 6302. Taiwan: Internal Development and Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

The social, political, and economic development in Taiwan since World War II; Taiwan’s foreign affairs.

IAFF 6305. U.S.-South Asia Relations. 3 Credits.

The nature of challenges and opportunities facing the South Asia region and the U.S. policy response. The rise of India as a global actor; relations between India and Pakistan; political transformation in the countries of the region, including Nepal and Sri Lanka.

IAFF 6308. Intl Relations of South Asia. 3 Credits.

IAFF 6318. Special Topics in Asian Studies. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6321. European and Eurasian Studies Cornerstone. 3 Credits.

Survey of current research on Europe and Eurasia. Research paper required. Required of M.A. candidates in European and Eurasian studies; open to others with permission of the instructor.

IAFF 6338. Special Topics in European and Eurasian Studies. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6339. European and Eurasian Studies Capstone. 3 Credits.

Survey of current research on Europe and Eurasia. Research paper required. Required of M.A. candidates in European and Eurasian studies; open to others with permission of the instructor.

IAFF 6341. Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Cornerstone. 3 Credits.

Multidisciplinary foundation course for the Latin American and hemispheric studies program.

IAFF 6342. Drug Trafficking in the Americas. 3 Credits.

A historical, comparative, and contemporary picture of drug trafficking in the Americas and the anti-narcotics policies to combat this trade.

IAFF 6343. Indigenous Social Movements. 3 Credits.

IAFF 6357. Pre-Capstone Workshop. 1 Credit.

IAFF 6358. Special Topics in Latin American and Hemispheric Studies. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6359. Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Capstone. 3 Credits.

A project-oriented course, designed to apply the skills and synthesize the knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in Latin American and hemispheric studies.

IAFF 6361. Middle East Studies Cornerstone. 1 Credit.

Multidisciplinary foundation course for the Middle East studies program. Introduction to key issues.

IAFF 6362. RegionalSecurity in MiddleEast. 3 Credits.

The nature, elements, and future of security in the Middle East region. Various analytical frameworks are examined to consider the interplay of national interests, ideology, and regionalism. Issues in regional security.

IAFF 6363. PoliticalEconomy/Middle East. 3 Credits.

Current political economy of the Middle East, including an overview of Islamic economic concepts and political organizations.

IAFF 6364. Religion and Society in the Modern Middle East. 3 Credits.

Comparative overview, both historical and current, of religious and social trends in the Middle East.

IAFF 6378. Special Topics in Middle East Studies. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6379. Middle East Studies Capstone. 3 Credits.

A project-oriented course, designed to synthesize the skills and knowledge that students have acquired in their graduate study. Open only to M.A. candidates in Middle East studies.

IAFF 6501. Quant Analysis Int'l Aff Prac. 3 Credits.

Overview of quantitative measurement, data summary, statistical inference, and elementary modeling such as linear regression.

IAFF 6502. Professional Skills I. 1 Credit.

Short courses that focus on developing specialized skills for international affairs professionals. Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6503. Professional Skills II. 1 Credit.

Continuation of IAFF 6502. Short courses that focus on developing specialized skills for international affairs professionals. Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6504. Intermediate Conversation. 1 Credit.

Short courses designed to develop professional language skills for international affairs students. Specific languages announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6505. Elliott School Seminars. 0-3 Credits.

Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes.

IAFF 6515. Graduate Internship in International Affairs. 0 Credits.

Limited to Elliott School M.A. degree candidates. Internship and research paper involving experience at an international organization or with international issues.

IAFF 6516. Independent Study and Research. 1-3 Credits.

Limited to Elliott School M.A. degree candidates. Written permission of instructor required.

IAFF 6517. Independent Study and Research. 1-3 Credits.

IAFF 6521. U.S. Foreign Policy Summer Program. 3-4 Credits.

The institutions and ideas that shape U.S. foreign policy, including the U.S. Congress and administration, foreign embassies, international organizations, think tanks, interest groups, and media outlets. A separate section of the course covers issues of reporting on foreign policy issues.

IAFF 6898. Capstone Workshop. 1 Credit.

The first part of a two-semester project that addresses a concrete policy problem or issue in international affairs. In small teams, students refine the policy question of the capstone project, develop a research strategy, select appropriate research methods, and begin research.

IAFF 6899. Capstone Course. 3 Credits.

Completion of the capstone sequence by conduct of the group's research, completion of the capstone report, and oral presentation of research findings and recommendations. Prerequisites: IAFF 6898.

IAFF 6998. Thesis. 3 Credits.

Open to Elliott School M.A. candidates who have selected the thesis option.

IAFF 6999. Thesis. 3 Credits.

Open to Elliott School M.A. candidates who have selected the thesis option.