Regulations

Admission

Student Progression

Financial Regulations

Health and Safety

Academic Regulations

Formal Complaints


Admission

To be considered for admission to any GW Nursing program, an applicant must complete the online application and pay a non-refundable $80 fee on the TargetX platform application. Unofficial transcripts must be submitted from each academic institution attended, regardless of whether credit was earned. Detailed application information is available on the school website at nursing.gwu.edu. Applicants should refer to the individual program descriptions for details on prerequisites and supporting documentation, which varies by program. It is the responsibility of applicants to ensure that all required application materials are submitted by the designated deadlines. Official copies of all transcripts are required upon matriculation. All records become the property of GW Nursing and are not returned. In addition, admitted applicants may need to submit information from a criminal background check, drug screen, physical examination and evidence of required immunizations and health insurance coverage depending on the program option.

Conditional Admission

Admission with conditions may be offered at the discretion of the admissions committee and the program dean. The terms of admission are outlined in the letter of admission from GW Nursing. Students enrolled in clinical-based programs must complete a criminal background check and drug screen prior to enrollment in a clinical course. Criminal background checks and drug screens are conducted through GW Nursing preferred third-party vendor.

Advance Tuition Deposit

Upon notification of admission, the student is required to officially accept the offer of admission on the TargetX platform and submit an advance tuition deposit of $500.00. The deposit is credited toward tuition and is nonrefundable. Failure to pay this deposit may result in the revocation of a student’s offer of admission.

International Applicants

Applicants whose native language is not English or who are not citizens of countries where English is an official language must submit test scores from either Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the academic International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The following are the minimum scores for admission consideration:

  • TOEFL: 600 on paper-based; 100 on Internet-based
  • Academic IELTS: an overall band score of 7.0, with no individual band score below 6.0

The language test requirement may be waived for applicants who hold a degree from an accredited college or university located in a country in which English is the official language and also the language of instruction at the institution.

Readmission

Students who were previously registered in a GW Nursing program but did not register during the immediately preceding semester (summer sessions excluded) must apply for readmission. Students who have attended other academic institutions while not enrolled at GW Nursing must have official transcripts sent directly to the GW Nursing Office of Student Affairs from each institution attended. Applications for readmission are considered based on regulations currently in effect. Upon readmission, the student is subject to the regulations and requirements in place at the time of readmission. Readmission is not guaranteed.

Change of Specialty

A change of specialty request is treated like a new application for admission. The student must complete the same application process and meet the same deadlines as other prospective students. Requests are considered during the normal admission cycle and occur only during the specialties’ regular admission term. There may be circumstances when the program director can make an exception to the timeline, in consultation with the program dean. All deadlines for program- or track-specific clinical placement deadlines apply. Students already enrolled at GW Nursing do not receive preferential treatment in the selection process; their applications are considered along with all other applicants.

Transfer Credit

Undergraduate Students

Advanced standing may be awarded for appropriate non-nursing coursework completed at other accredited institutions, provided minimum grade requirements have been met. The minimum acceptable grade is ‘C’ for coursework to be applied toward an undergraduate degree. GW Nursing reserves the right to determine course equivalency and degree applicability. Students awarded advanced standing may need to take additional courses to satisfy credit requirements for degree conferral. Accelerated BSN students may not transfer any nursing course to GW Nursing. Applicants or admitted students are counseled by the program dean and/or student affairs staff that nursing courses completed at other academic institutions are not eligible for transfer into their GW Nursing program of study. 

Graduate Students

Up to 6 credits of coursework may be accepted as transfer credit for graduate students, provided the coursework was completed within the past five years at an accredited college or university with a minimum grade of B. A limited amount of additional transfer credit may be approved upon petition to the associate dean for the MSN or DNP program. GW Nursing reserves the right to determine course equivalency and degree applicability. Up to 9 credits in the GW Nursing BSN program are eligible to be applied to the MSN program. The completed credits are eligible to be used for the graduate program within five years of graduation. 

Degree candidates who are currently enrolled at this institution and plan to take courses at other accredited institutions for transfer credit must secure prior approval from the program dean.

Student Progression

Course Withdrawal

After the fourth week of classes, a dropped course is considered a withdrawal and a notation of W will appear on the transcript. Students may withdraw three weeks prior to the last day of the course. Course start date and end dates may be found on the Schedule of Classes.

Leave of Absence

A leave of absence (LOA) is a temporary period of non-attendance available to continuing students. A student who must interrupt active pursuit of the degree may petition the senior associate dean for academic affairs, through the associate dean of the respective program, for an LOA for a specified period of time, limited to a maximum of one calendar year. The LOA must be requested and approved by submitting the Leave of Absence/Continuous Enrollment Registration form to the program director and the associate dean of the respective program on or before the first day of the term in which the leave of absence is to be taken, and the date of return from the leave of absence must also be recorded on this form. The period of time designated as an LOA does not count toward the time of completion of the respective program. If the request is approved, the student must register for LOA in each specified semester, following regular registration procedures.

Degree candidates who discontinue their studies without being granted an LOA and students granted leave who do not return to active study at the close of the period of approved absence must reapply for admission and are subject to the regulations and requirements in effect when they re-enroll. The right to use university facilities is suspended while the leave is in effect. If required courses are not available at the time of a student’s return from an LOA, the student will be placed on administrative LOA status for the semester. This administrative LOA does not count against the number of LOA's taken.

Return from Leave of Absence

Students returning from LOA must complete a Return from Leave of Absence form. If the program director imposes any conditions on the student's return from an LOA, they communicate the conditions to the student in writing and send copies to the assistant dean for student affairs and the director of student services. A hold is placed on the student's registration until the program director confirms in writing to the director of student services that all conditions have been met for the student's return. If no conditions have been imposed by the program director for return from an LOA, students are not required to receive approval to return if they are returning within the predetermined period. Exceptions to this LOA policy must be approved by the associate program dean in consultation with the senior associate dean for academic affairs and the assistant dean for student affairs.

Financial Regulations

GW Nursing adopted the financial regulations for the academic year covered by this Bulletin. Visit the University Financial Fees and Regulations website for additional information.

The ABSN program's total tuition cost is billed over four consecutive semesters. If an ABSN student becomes out of progression and completes the ABSN program in more than four semesters, additional tuition and fees will be assessed at the established per credit hour rate

Drop-Refund Schedule for Oregon Residents (Online Program Only)

Oregon residents enrolled in an online education course are allowed a modified tuition refund policy in order to meet Oregon State Mandate OAR 583-030-0035(18)(c). An Oregon student who withdraws from an online course is eligible for a partial refund through the middle week of the term. Refunds are based on unused instructional time and are prorated on a weekly basis. Students must be current residents of Oregon at the time of course registration and withdrawal to be eligible for this modified refund policy.

Oregon residents only:
Courses Dropped Percentage
During the first week of classes 100%
On or before the end of the second week of classes 100%
On or before the end of the third week of classes 60%
On or before the end of the fourth week of classes 40%
On or before the end of the fifth week of classes 20%
On or before the end of the sixth week of classes 20%
On or before the end of the seventh week of classes 20%
After the seventh week of classes None

Financial Aid

GW offers financial assistance to all eligible students from a variety of resources. Financial aid consists of awards for academic achievement or talent without reference to financial circumstances (merit scholarships) and scholarships, grants, loans, and employment based on academic achievement and demonstrated financial need. GW Nursing scholarships are only applicable to tuition and must be accepted for the term in which they were offered. Scholarships cannot be deferred to future semesters.

Gift aid (scholarships, grants, fellowships, assistantships, etc.) is taxable to the extent that it exceeds the allowable costs of tuition, fees, and required books and supplies or is dedicated to other costs, such as room and board. Federal grants may be taxable if, together with other gift assistance, they exceed the allowable costs. In the case of a student who is awarded tuition scholarships, grants, or awards from more than one source, the combined amount may not exceed tuition charges; institutional aid is adjusted to this limit.

In general, consideration for financial aid is restricted to students in good academic standing who are at least half-time, meet the minimum grade-point average for particular awards and are not financially encumbered by any other office of the university. Applications for institutional or federal aid may not be processed if the relevant tax returns have not been filed in accordance with the IRS Code. Documents submitted as part of aid applications become the property of GW and may not be returned. Federal regulations require that GW report suspected cases of fraud or misrepresentation to the appropriate federal, state, and local authorities.

Current information on financial aid can be found on the Office of Student Financial Assistance website.

Health and Safety

Health and Accident Insurance

All GW students are required to have health and accident insurance. Students who fail to maintain such insurance may be placed on LOA without a tuition refund. On-campus undergraduate students are automatically enrolled in GW's Student Health Insurance Program (SHIP). Students who have acquired their own insurance must waive the GW student health insurance each academic year and have this item removed from their bill. Graduate students must submit verification of health insurance coverage to the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team.

Verification of Health Status

GW Nursing requires all students to complete a full physical examination within twelve months prior to the beginning of clinical courses.

Compliance with HIPAA and OSHA Guidelines

The sites at which students pursue their clinical experience must comply with federal guidelines for the education of employees regarding the prevention of the spread of bloodborne pathogens and patient privacy; therefore, such sites require that all students provide evidence of relevant annual training. Students must complete the required GW Nursing modules on HIPAA and OSHA.

Immunization Requirements

The District of Columbia Immunization Law requires that all students under the age of 26 enrolled in on-campus programs at the University, provide proof of certain immunizations. 

In addition, GW Nursing requires all clinical students to submit verification of health and immunization status prior to commencing any clinical coursework. All undergraduate and graduate students in clinical programs must submit the required documentation to the clinical compliance tracking system. GW Medical Services is available to provide any needed inoculations on a fee-for-service basis.

Undergraduate students who have not provided proof of necessary immunization by the end of the second week of classes may be removed from classes and are not permitted to register for the subsequent semester until such proof is provided. Graduate students are not permitted to enroll in clinical courses without completion of immunization requirements.

Academic Regulations

Accommodations for Disability

Reasonable accommodations are made for applicants with disabilities who can meet the requirements noted below after review by GW Disability Support Services. These accommodations must be accomplished without altering the essential requirements of the nursing curriculum. Inability to meet the technical standards throughout program enrollment necessitates further review which may delay or terminate progression and/or enrollment in the program.

Any need for special accommodations must be addressed specifically by the student with GW Disability Support Services. Only GW Disability Support Services can recommend accommodations or state the specific accommodations that faculty members will provide. Coursework undertaken prior to the student’s application and approval for special accommodation is not subject to special accommodation. Such accommodations are not applied retroactively to the completion of that process.

Technical and Academic Standards for Nursing Students

Technical standards are a necessary component to the complex discipline of nursing that all students must meet with or without reasonable accommodations. Students wishing to enter GW Nursing bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), master of science in nursing (MSN), and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs must demonstrate that they can meet these technical standards and continue to do so throughout their education program.

GW Nursing is committed to equal access for all persons in its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. The University abides by the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and other applicable statutes and regulations relating to equality of opportunity.

GW Nursing curricula leading to the eligibility for licensure as a registered nurse or advanced practice registered nurse require students to engage in diverse, complex, and specific experiences. Cognitive, affective, psychomotor, physical, and social abilities are required to satisfactorily perform these functions, which are essential to the successful completion of requirements for GW Nursing degree programs (BSN, MSN, DNP) and post-master’s certificates. These abilities also are necessary to ensure the health and safety of patients, self, faculty, and other healthcare providers. As outlined below, these functions comprise the technical standards performance requirements for students.

Technical standards include, but are not limited to, the following:

Motor Skills
  • General: The student must have motor functions sufficient for the execution of movements needed to provide general care and treatment to patients in all healthcare settings.
  • Specific: The student must possess the motor skills necessary to execute assessment and therapeutic procedures such as inspection, palpation, percussion, auscultation, and other diagnostic maneuvers and procedures. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional uses of the senses of touch, vision, and hearing.
  • Specific: The student must be able to perform basic life support (including CPR), transfer and position patients, and position and re-position self around patients. The student must also be able to operate equipment typically found in the healthcare environment (IV pumps, cardiac monitor, and electric and manual blood pressure equipment, safe patient handling equipment, etc.).
Sensory/Observation
  • General: The student must be able to acquire information presented through demonstration and experience in the basic and nursing sciences.
  • Specific: The student must be able to observe the patient accurately, at a distance and close at hand, and observe nonverbal communications when performing nursing assessments and interventions or administering medications. The student must be able to perceive the signs of disease and infection as manifested through physical examination. Such information may be derived from visual inspection and images of the body surfaces, palpable changes in various organs and tissues, and auditory information (patient voice, heart tones, bowel and lung sounds, etc.)
Communication
  • General: The student must have the ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with other students, faculty, staff, patients, family, and other professionals.
  • Specific: The student must be able to express their ideas and feelings clearly and demonstrate a willingness and ability to give and receive feedback. The student must be able to convey or exchange information at a proficiency level sufficient to obtain a health history, identify problems presented, explain alternative solutions, and give directions during treatment and post-treatment. The student must be able to effectively communicate in English through verbal, written, and electronic formats, with the ability to retrieve information from various sources of literature and computerized databases. The student must be able to communicate verbally in English in classroom presentations, seminars, simulation, practicum sites, practicum conferences, and online formats. The student must be able to process and communicate information on the patient’s status with accuracy in a timely manner to members of the health care team. The appropriate communication also may rely on the student’s ability to make a correct judgment seeking supervision and consultation in a timely manner.
Cognitive
  • General: The student must be able to measure, calculate, reason, prioritize, analyze, integrate, synthesize information, and act with integrity and judgment (ability to manage impulsivity). The student must have the ability to sustain attention and memory to maintain patient safety. 
  • Specific: The student must be able to read and comprehend extensive written materials. The student also must be able to evaluate and apply information and engage in critical thinking in the classroom, lab, and clinical setting within the time constraints unique to each setting.
Behavioral/Emotional
  • General: The student must possess the emotional health required for the effective use of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the nursing care of patients and families.
  • Specific: The student must be able to maintain mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients, students, faculty, staff, and other professionals in all circumstances, including highly stressful situations. They must have the emotional stability to function effectively under stress and to adapt to an environment that may change rapidly without warning and/or in unpredictable ways. The student must be able to experience empathy for the situations and circumstances of others and effectively communicate that empathy. They must know how their own values, attitudes, beliefs, emotions, and experiences affect their perceptions and relationships with others. The student must be able and willing to examine their behavior when it interferes with productive individual or team relationships. The student must possess the skills and experience necessary for effective and harmonious relationships in diverse academic and work environments.
  • Specific: The student must be able to meet School of Nursing attendance requirements. The student must be able to satisfy all requirements set forth by clinical affiliation agreements as well as any additional requirements of any clinical setting. The student must uphold professional nursing standards related to the student's scope of practice.
Professional Conduct
  • General: The student must possess the ability to reason morally and practice nursing in an ethical manner.
  • Specific: The student must be willing to learn and abide by professional standards of practice. They must possess attributes that include compassion, empathy, altruism, integrity, honesty, responsibility, and tolerance. The student must be able to engage in patient care delivery in all settings and be able to deliver care to all patient populations, including, but not limited to, children, adolescents, adults, individuals with disabilities, medically compromised patients, and vulnerable adults.

Scholarship Requirements

All students must maintain satisfactory academic progress in attempted coursework to be eligible to continue enrollment in their program.  Undergraduate students must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.8 during their degree program and receive no more than one notation of Z or W in any given semester. A minimum grade of B is required in clinical courses and a minimum grade of C is required in didactic courses.

Graduate students must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 during their degree program and receive no more than one notation of Z or W in any given semester. A minimum grade of B is required in clinical courses and a minimum grade of C is required in didactic courses.  Students must also earn a minimum grade of B in NURS 6220, NURS 6222, and NURS 6234. PMHNP students must earn a minimum of grade B in NURS 6242 and NURS 6243. For DNP and PhD students a minimum grade of B is required in every course, including electives.    

Although transfer credit may be assigned, courses taken at other institutions are not considered in computing the grade-point average. Symbols that may appear on the transcript include CR (Credit); AU (Audit) P (Pass); NP (No Pass); I (Incomplete); IPG (In Progress); W (Authorized Withdrawal); and Z (Unauthorized Withdrawal). These symbols are not included in determining the GPA.  A student who earns a grade below B in a clinical course cannot progress in the clinical portion of the program until that course is successfully completed. Both grades remain on the student's transcript and are calculated in the final grade-point average.

Time to Program Completion

Students admitted to the GW Nursing BSN program are expected to complete all program requirements and graduate in four semesters, including summer sessions, from the point of matriculation. If a student falls out of progression because of a course failure or course withdrawal, the student will have a total of six semesters to complete all degree requirements and graduate. If the student does not graduate within six semesters, they are subject to academic dismissal from the program. These time limits do not apply to students on approved LOAs and/or those who are deployed for military duty.

Students admitted to a GW Nursing MSN program are allowed no more than four and a half years (thirteen semesters, including summer sessions) from the point of matriculation to complete all degree requirements and graduate. Students admitted to the GW Nursing APRN Certificate Program are allowed no more than two and a half years (eight semesters, including summer sessions) to complete the AGPCNP or FNP Certificate; and three years (six semesters, including summer sessions) to complete the AGACNP or PHMNP certificate. These time limits do not apply to students on approved LOAs and/or those who are deployed for military duty.

Students admitted to a GW Nursing DNP program who entered through the post-BSN to DNP pathway are allowed no more than seven years (twenty-one semesters, including summer sessions) from the point of matriculation to complete all degree requirements and graduate. Students who entered through the post-MSN to DNP pathway are allowed no more than five years (fifteen semesters, including summer sessions] from the point of matriculation to complete all degree requirements and graduate. These time limits do not apply to students on approved LOAs and/or those who are deployed for military duty.

Students admitted to the GW Nursing PhD program must have their doctoral dissertation written and defended within seven years (21 semesters, including summer sessions) from the point of matriculation. Exceptions to the seven-year limit are rarely given and only with compelling evidence that the student has made all practical efforts to complete within seven years. A student must be admitted to candidacy, which follows a successful PhD dissertation defense, within four years (twelve semesters, including summer sessions) after matriculation in the PhD program and at least one academic year before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. The student must complete all program requirements within three years (nine semesters, including summer sessions) following admission to candidacy.  

If it becomes apparent that a student will not complete all degree requirements and graduate within the time allowed, the student may petition GW Nursing for an extension of time to complete their degree. To request an extension of time, students must complete a Request for Policy Exception form and submit the form to their program dean for review. If the request is approved, the student must maintain appropriate registration during the authorized period of the extension. An LOA is not permitted during the approved extension period.

Academic Probation

Undergraduate students who fail to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.8 are placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation are required to meet with their academic advisor to develop an Academic Success Plan. The Academic Success Plan must be approved by the program dean. A student must achieve at least a 2.8 cumulative GPA in order for the probation to be lifted. While on probation, undergraduate students may register for no more than 13 credits per semester, unless approved by the program dean. Students may be dismissed if they remain on probation for two consecutive semesters.

Graduate students who fail to achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.0 are placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation are required to meet with their academic advisor to develop an Academic Success Plan. The Academic Success Plan must be approved by the program dean. A student must achieve at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA for the probation to be lifted.  Students may be dismissed if they remain on probation for two consecutive semesters.

Academic dismissal

The conditions warranting academic dismissal include, but are not limited to:

  • Remaining on academic probation for two consecutive semesters.
  • Unsatisfactory grade in a required course a second time.
  • Failure to complete all degree or certificate requirements within the time limit.
  • Academic misconduct as determined by an Academic Integrity Panel.           
  • Violation of professional comportment standards.
  • Failure to meet the terms of a conditional admission.

Notification of academic dismissal is communicated to the student in writing by the program dean, with copies to the senior associate dean for academic affairs, the assistant dean of student affairs, the director of student services, and the program director.  The dismissal notification letter is maintained in the official student record. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain current information (address, phone number, email address, emergency contact, etc.) with GW Nursing and the University.  Students may appeal a dismissal decision by a program dean by providing additional information to the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Students who are academically dismissed may reapply to the School of Nursing one calendar year from the time of dismissal.

Procedures for the Evaluation of Professional Comportment

Students enrolled in GW Nursing programs are required to conform to all rules, regulations and policies outlined in the University Bulletin. In addition to the University Bulletin, GW Nursing students must adhere to the regulations outlined below.

As members of the healthcare community, GW Nursing students are expected to behave in a manner consistent with the principals and obligations inherent to professional practice. Some behaviors or patterns, either during the didactic or clinical phase, may raise concerns as to the student’s suitability to continue in the program of study. Inappropriate behaviors for a nursing student may include, but are not limited to, breaching patient confidentiality, undertaking a procedure or scope of practice beyond that of a student, disobeying or showing disrespect for others, bullying (including students, faculty, and patients), showing a judgmental attitude toward patients, or revealing a lack of concern or compassion in practice.  The process described below is intended to address behaviors that are unacceptable to GW Nursing and raise questions about the student’s fitness for the practice of nursing.

When a problem with professional comportment (other than academic dishonesty) regarding a student is perceived, the observer communicates this concern to the relevant associate dean for the program. If the communication is verbal, it must be confirmed immediately by a signed written statement or else it is not pursued further. Upon receiving such a communication, the associate dean creates a confidential file in which all documents pertaining to the matter will be placed. The contents of the file are preserved for a period of time not less than five years from the date of separation or graduation from GW Nursing. Access to this file is restricted to the student under consideration (and their advisor, should they elect to have one), the program director, the associate dean for the program, the senior associate dean for academic affairs, the dean, the assistant dean of student affairs and their staff, the GW Nursing Standing Progression Subcommittee of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee (ASAC Subcommittee), and others who the dean or the senior associate dean for academic affairs determines need access.  The ASAC Subcommittee members are: the assistant dean for student affairs, the associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion, and six (6) elected faculty. The chair of the Subcommittee will be elected by the ASAC committee.

The associate dean for the program notifies the student in writing that they have received a communication from an individual who perceives that the student has a problem with professional comportment. The written notice will include a description of the reported problem with professional comportment along with a copy of these procedures. The associate dean for the program meets informally with the student as soon as possible. At that meeting, or as soon thereafter as possible, the associate dean for the program may do one or more of the following:

  • Advise the student.
  • Recommend that the student seek professional assistance, at the student's expense.
  • Gather additional information through contacts with the student, their peers, faculty, professional consultants, and/or any other source deemed to have relevant information. With the student's concurrence, they may be referred for a medical, psychiatric, and/or psychological evaluation. With student consent, the written report from the healthcare provider will be included in the student case file.
  • Notify the senior associate dean for academic affairs and refer the case to GW Nursing ASAC Subcommittee. The senior associate dean notifies the student in writing that the case is under review.

The ASAC Subcommittee investigates the allegation by reviewing the student's confidential file and conducting transcribed information gathering sessions. The student under review and the student's advisor may attend the information gathering sessions.  While the student’s advisor may accompany the student to these sessions, the advisor may not participate in the sessions or in any part of the Comportment process (the role of the advisor is limited to consultation with the student they are advising; they may not address the Subcommittee, question witnesses, or speak on behalf of the student they are advising). The student may submit written questions to be answered by persons interviewed by the ASAC Subcommittee, but the procedure regarding their questioning is left to the sole discretion of the ASAC Subcommittee, including whether the questions submitted by the student are modified and/or posed to the persons interviewed. The student also may suggest persons be interviewed by the ASAC Subcommittee, but the decision to interview such persons is left to the sole discretion of the ASAC Subcommittee. The student may speak on their own behalf and may submit other materials for review. The materials and/or statements to be considered and the weight to be given to them are left to the sole discretion of the ASAC Subcommittee. The student and the student's advisor cannot be present when the ASAC Subcommittee meets in executive session.

Meetings of the ASAC Subcommittee are confidential. Minutes of the ASAC Subcommittee are placed in the student's confidential file upon the completion of the review. The ASAC Subcommittee makes its final written recommendation(s) to the senior associate dean for academic affairs using the School of Nursing template form. The ASAC Subcommittee Chair may review and sign the final recommendation(s) on behalf of the ASAC Subcommittee. The recommendation(s) could include, but is (are) not limited to, one or more of the following:

  • Advising the student.
  • Recommending that the student seek professional assistance, at the student's expense.
  • Recommending conditions with which the student must comply in order to continue in GW Nursing.
  • Recommending sanctions, which may include but is not limited to, reprimand, probation, dismissal.
  • The confidential file be made part of the student's permanent academic record.

The senior associate dean for academic affairs and the associate dean for the program will review the student's confidential file and the recommendation(s) of the ASAC Subcommittee. The senior associate dean for academic affairs may meet with the student prior to making a decision. The senior associate dean for academic affairs takes whatever decision they deem appropriate and informs the student in writing.

The student shall have seven calendar days in which to appeal the decision of the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Such appeal shall be in writing sent to the GW Nursing dean. A student may only appeal on the following grounds: (i) a material deviation of the procedures set forth above which affected the outcome of the process; (ii) outcome was clearly disproportionate and/or inappropriate to the conduct for which student was found responsible; (iii) new and relevant information that was not reasonably available at the time of the proceeding that would materially affect outcome; and (iv) evidence of actual bias or conflict of interest by any of the decision makers that affected the outcome. Failure to appeal the decision shall be deemed a waiver of any and all rights to challenge the senior associate dean for academic affairs decision.

The dean or their designee will make a decision and inform the student in writing. This decision is added to the student confidential file. The dean decision is final.

At any time during the process, if the student selects an advisor, the student must inform the associate dean for the program at least two (2) calendar days in advance of the meeting or session. GW retains the right to have legal counsel present at any meeting or proceeding.

Evaluation of Academic Performance

Faculty members are responsible for evaluating the performance of students in a meaningful, useful and timely manner and for assigning grades on a basis that is rational, just and unbiased. The authority for assignment of grades rests with faculty members in the respective programs.

Appeal Procedures for Cases of Alleged Improper Academic Evaluation

The purpose of this process is to resolve student assertions of “cases of alleged arbitrary or capricious academic evaluation” in the form of a course grade in the School of Nursing (GW Nursing) and in accordance with the GW Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Nature of grievances covered under this process:

This policy and procedure pertains to a student assertion of arbitrary or capricious assignment of course grade (a “grade grievance”). Cases of academic dishonesty are not included here (see Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities: Code of Academic Integrity), nor are allegations of discrimination (see Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities: Student Grievance Procedures).

Instructor responsibilities:

It is the responsibility of the course instructor to provide a syllabus (or course outline) to each student in a course at the beginning of the semester that clearly sets forth the instructor’s grading policy in the course. It is also the responsibility of the instructor to adhere to the grading policy stated in the syllabus, or, if changes are made, to announce and implement them in a manner that is not prejudicial to the evaluation any student receives from the course instructor.

Student responsibilities:

It is the responsibility of the student to communicate clearly with the instructor and on a timely basis about any grading issues in a course. If the student is not clear about the syllabus, the grading policy or a grade on a student assignment or other work product, the student should immediately initiate a discussion with the instructor.

Confidentiality:

Students, faculty, instructors, academic administrators, and university employees shall maintain the confidentiality of matters related to grade grievances, in a manner consistent with university policies, including the Privacy of Student Records policy, and applicable privacy laws.

File retention:

It shall be the responsibility of the GW Nursing senior associate dean for academic affairs and the associate dean for the program to retain files regarding disputes beginning with a student’s “Notification of Grade Grievance” filing. These files shall be retained for two academic years. No materials will be placed in individual student files in program offices, nor will notations be made on academic transcripts.

GW Nursing Process:

Appeal Procedures for Cases of Alleged Improper Academic Evaluation - Students who believe that a grade or evaluation is capricious and/or arbitrary should use the following appeal procedures:

The only grounds for a grade appeal request, is arbitrary and capricious grading, meaning that the grading standard was not properly applied. Arbitrary and capricious grading is considered in the event the assignment of the course grade is based upon something other than performance in the course; the assignment of the course grade is made based upon the unreasonable application of standards different from the standards that were applied to other students in that course; or when the assignment of the course grade is based upon a substantial and unreasonable departure from the written academic standards for that course. In the event a student believes the grade has been assigned in an arbitrary or capricious manner, a Grade Appeal Form may be submitted.  The following procedures will be adhered to:

 I. Attempt resolution with the relevant faculty member and the student’s program dean.

  1. The student must complete Section 1 of the Grade Appeal Form and submit this written appeal to the relevant faculty member within five calendar days of the time the grade is posted, with a copy to the program dean. If the program dean is the faculty member who assigned the grade or evaluation under review, the student should request that the senior associate dean for academic affairs assign a senior academic official to conduct the review process.
  2. The faculty member will review the student’s Grade Appeal and complete Section 2 of the form. Upon completion, the faculty member will submit the form to the program dean, or designated senior academic official, with the student in copy.
  3. A review shall be conducted by the program dean, consulting with the student and respective faculty member(s) involved with the grade or evaluation under review as the program dean finds appropriate. If the program dean is the faculty member who assigned the grade or evaluation under review, then a senior academic official will conduct the review process, and the student will be notified of the change.
  4. Following the program dean’s, or designated academic officials review, the decision will be added in Section 3 of the Grade Appeal Form. The completed Grade Appeal Form will be provided to the student and the faculty member.

 II. Appeal to the senior associate dean for academic affairs within five calendar days of the decision of the program dean (or senior academic official, if applicable).

  1. The student must submit to the senior associate dean for academic affairs a written letter of appeal, accompanied by the completed Grade Appeal Form used in Step I and any other supporting documentation that the student deems relevant.
  2. The senior associate dean for academic affairs will refer the appeal request to the Standing Progression Subcommittee of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee (ASAC Subcommittee) to provide guidance and recommendations.  The committee reviews all material and may consult with the student, faculty, or relevant individuals as required.  The ASAC Subcommittee members are: the assistant dean for student affairs, the associate dean for diversity equity, and inclusion, and six (6) elected faculty. The chair of the Subcommittee will be elected by the ASAC committee.
  3. The senior associate dean for academic affairs (or delegate) will render a decision in writing to the student with the student’s program dean and faculty member in copy. The decision of the senior associate dean for academic affairs is final.

Two Attempts to Succesfully Pass a Course

Students have two attempts to successfully pass a course. Two attempts are allowed per course, per admission to a specific academic program or track. Both grades remain on the student's transcript and are calculated in their final GPA. Students are not guaranteed two attempts at a course if conditions already exist for a dismissal. Reinstatements do not extend the two-attempt policy.

Students who are unsuccessful in a course that is no longer offered may take an equivalent course, if applicable, as a first attempt. The initial course remains on the transcript and the grade is calculated in their GPA.  Students will have two attempts at the new/equivalent course if the course can be completed within two semesters of taking the initial course.

Audit

GW Nursing undergraduate students who have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 may take graduate-level non-clinical courses for audit. Written approval from the course instructor, advisor, and associate deans for the MSN and DNP programs is required. Enrollment in a graduate-level course does not in any way imply subsequent GW Nursing approval for credit toward a graduate degree. Graduate-level tuition and fees apply. Students are responsible for additional costs.

Course Waiver

If a student takes a course at an institution other than GW, they must apply for a waiver to substitute a course if the course is in a GW Nursing required plan of study. The number of credits is not transferred to GW Nursing and the student will need to make up the waived number of credits. A course waiver must be requested in writing and must include justification for the request from the student’s program director, who meets with the student to discuss how the waiver may affect their plan of study. For undergraduate students, the course waiver must be requested upon admission to the program and can only be for a pre-nursing course. No nursing courses can be waived based upon coursework at another institution. The student must have earned a grade of “B” or better in the course to be eligible for a waiver. MSN and DNP students must provide the program director with a course description or syllabus of the previously taken course, along with a transcript showing the grade the student received. The program director will make a recommendation regarding the waiver request. The student must then submit the program director’s recommendation, waiver request, official transcript, and course description to the associate dean of their program. The advisor, the student, and the program director are notified of the decision in writing. All students receiving course waivers will be required, with advisement, to take another course that will provide the appropriate number of credits to compensate for the waived course.

Changes in Course Enrollment

A student may not substitute one course for another without the approval of the program director and the associate dean for the program. After the deadlines for adding or dropping courses, a student must obtain the permission of the program director and the associate dean for the program to withdraw from a course. Students are subject to all GW financial regulations with respect to changes in course enrollment as outlined in this Bulletin. 

Formal Complaints

Purpose: provide a policy and procedure for filing a complaint arising from a person(s) internal or external to GW Nursing. All information regarding the complaint shall be kept confidential. Those investigating a complaint may only discuss it with those individuals who are immediately involved in the dispute. If GW Nursing deems a complaint to be “inappropriate” under this policy, the person submitting the complaint will be notified of a more appropriate avenue to pursue resolution.

Non-Academic Complaint

A non-academic complaint is an allegation by a student concerning (1) a GW employee or affiliate, (2) a GW student, (3) administrative policies, procedures, regulations, or requirements, or (4) a service or activity.

If a student believes that they have been discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression in any of the policies, procedures, programs or activities of or by any individual employed by or acting in an official capacity for The George Washington University, please see The George Washington University Guide to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Academic Complaint

An academic complaint is a formal complaint regarding a grade or evaluation of a student’s performance. Faculty members are responsible for determining the curriculum of a course, for developing appropriate methods of evaluating student learning, for evaluating fairly, for upholding academic standards, and for enforcing policies concerning academic honesty. (See GW Code of Academic Integrity). To initiate a formal academic complaint, students should follow the procedures outlined in the Appeal Procedures for Cases of Alleged Improper Academic Evaluation, above.


Explanation of Course Numbers

  • Courses in the 1000s are primarily introductory undergraduate courses
  • Those in the 2000s to 4000s are upper-division undergraduate courses that also may be taken for graduate credit with permission and additional work assigned
  • Those in the 6000s and 8000s are for master’s, doctoral, and professional-level students
  • The 6000s are open to advanced undergraduate students with approval of the instructor and the dean or advising office

NURS 3101. Ethical Foundations of Nursing. 3 Credits.

Ethical theory and principles as they relate to a variety of common ethical and moral dilemmas that challenge nursing professionals in their clinical practice.

NURS 3102. Nutrition for Health Professionals. 3 Credits.

Human nutrition fundamentals and the scientific foundation; nutritional requirements related to changing individual and family needs, food choices, health behaviors, food safety, prevention of chronic disease and nutrition-related public health in the United States and other countries.

NURS 3103. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Credits.

Fundamental structures and functions as they relate to the human body: homeostasis, anatomical language and body organization, tissues and histology, integumentary; skeletal; muscular; nervous, and endocrine systems. Students should have a basic background in introductory cell/molecular biology before enrolling.

NURS 3104. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Credits.

Fundamental structures and functions as they relate to the human body: homeostasis, anatomical language and body organization, tissues and histology, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students should have a basic background in introductory cell/molecular biology before enrolling. Prerequisite: NURS 3103.

NURS 3105. Microbiology for Health Professionals. 4 Credits.

The structural and functional characteristics of microbes; prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viruses, in the context of human health.

NURS 3106. Introduction to Statistics for Health Professionals. 3 Credits.

A concepts-based course introducing students to the theory, practice, and application of probability and statistics to health care research questions.

NURS 3107. Introduction to Math for Health Professionals. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the concept-based theory, practice, and application of math to dosage calculations in healthcare.

NURS 3110W. Transition into the Nursing Profession. 2 Credits.

Values and characteristics of the nursing profession in the context of history and current legal, regulatory, and ethical contexts. Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.

NURS 3118. Pharmacology I. 2 Credits.

The underlying principles of pharmacology and medication administration. Restricted to students in the BSN program. Prerequisites: NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, and NURS 3122.

NURS 3119. Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

Pathophysiology and diagnostic assessments of common disease conditions affecting individuals across the lifespan. Restricted to students in the BSN program.

NURS 3120. Foundations of Professional Nursing. 6 Credits.

Basic nursing concepts and skills the beginning nurse needs to provide client- and family-centered care to diverse client populations. Prepares students to use the nursing process. Restricted to students in the BSN program.

NURS 3121. Health Assessment and Promotion. 3 Credits.

The knowledge and skills needed to conduct comprehensive and need-specific health assessments. Concepts of health promotion and disease prevention. Restricted to students in the BSN program.

NURS 3122. Principles of Safe Client Care. 2 Credits.

Client safety core concepts and values of professional nursing. Restricted to students in the BSN program.

NURS 3123. Quality Interprofessional Care of the Client. 2 Credits.

Basic concepts of improvement science in nursing and interprofessional health care. Builds on concepts of safety learned in NURS 3122. Prerequisites: NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, and NURS 3122.

NURS 3124. Adult and Geriatric Nursing I. 6 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course focusing on primary, secondary, and tertiary care in the adult and geriatric client. Incorporates the nursing process into the provision of client- and family-centered care. Restricted to students in the BSN program. Prerequisites: NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122.

NURS 3125. Mental Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course focusing on the application of theories and implementation of evidence-based care for clients with psychiatric/mental health issues. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program. Prerequisites: NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122.

NURS 4099. Variable Topics. 1-10 Credits.

Assigned topics determined by the School of Nursing. Restricted to students with prior permission of the undergraduate division of the School of Nursing.

NURS 4105. Disaster Preparedness. 3 Credits.

Nursing disaster competencies guide nurses toward population well-being, including limiting injuries and maintaining community health. Disaster nurse roles, from rapid, effective response to care coordination, requires successful disaster competency. Restricted to students enrolled in the School of Nursing.

NURS 4106. Global Health. 3 Credits.

Students gain an understanding of factors that impact global health and the evidence based, interprofessional approaches needed to address current and future challenges. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program.

NURS 4107. Addictions and Treatment. 3 Credits.

A broad overview of principles of addiction and treatment. Topics include health education, risk reduction and the evolving process of treatment, recovery, behavior change, and growth. Restricted to students in the BSN program.

NURS 4108. Telehealth. 3 Credits.

Telehealth technologies and application to nursing practice. Emphasis on technology used, communication, conducting assessments, recognizing barriers in the effective use of telehealth, and advocating for policy change related to telehealth. Restricted to students in BSN program.

NURS 4109. Introduction to Perioperative Nursing. 3 Credits.

The role of the perioperative nurse and the fundamental knowledge, skills, and competencies needed to deliver safe, evidence-based, holistic care within a perioperative setting. Includes clinical experiences. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4118, NURS 4124, NURS 4125, NURS 4126, and NURS 4207.

NURS 4118. Pharmacology II. 2 Credits.

Build on the knowledge from NURS 3118 and apply principles of pharmacology to the nurse’s role in the pharmacological management of disease processes. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4207.

NURS 4119. Patient Safety and Health Care Quality. 3 Credits.

Processes and skills to provide safe, quality nursing care, encompassing five critical competencies: safe, patient-centered care; working in interdisciplinary teams; employing evidence-based practice; applying quality improvement; using informatics. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program.

NURS 4121. Nursing Advancement Portfolio. 15 Credits.

Collection of evidences to demonstrate student learning and competency throughout the curriculum as they relate to achievement of nursing baccalaureate program outcomes. The portfolio provides a means of organizing student accomplishments in their academic work and in their pursuit of professional career pathways.

NURS 4124. Adult and Geriatric Nursing 2. 5 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course focusing on primary, secondary, and tertiary care in the complex adult and geriatric client. Incorporates the nursing process into the provision of client and family-centered nursing care. Restricted to Students in the BSN program. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4207.

NURS 4125. Maternal and Women’s Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course focusing on women’s healthcare issues across the life span. The role of family and contemporary issues in women’s health. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4207.

NURS 4126. Nursing Care of Children and Families. 3 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course focusing on children and their families across primary, secondary, and tertiary care settings. Working in an interprofessional team, students prioritize and provide nursing care in hospital and community-based settings. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4207.

NURS 4127. Transition to Professional Nursing Practice. 5 Credits.

Didactic/clinical course designed to prepare students for professional practice. Students critically analyze and apply knowledge and skills learned in the program in a precepted clinical area. Focuses in part on preparation for the NCLEX-RN exam. Restricted to students in the bachelor of science in nursing program. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4118, NURS 4124, NURS 4125, NURS 4126, NURS 4207.

NURS 4203. Dynamics of Nursing Leadership and Management. 3 Credits.

Introduction to concepts of nursing leadership and management, showcasing the importance of each, while noting the crucial differences between them.

NURS 4205W. Nurse's Role in Health Care Policy. 3 Credits.

Understanding social, political, economic & population based dimensions of US healthcare policy using quality, access & cost. Includes significant engagement in writing as form of critical inquiry & scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.

NURS 4207W. Principles of Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Credits.

Development of student skills in research and practice-related knowledge necessary to implement evidence-based practice. Restricted to students in the BSN program. Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.

NURS 4217. Community and Public Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the principles of community and public health nursing with an emphasis on vulnerable populations. Restricted to BSN students. Prerequisites: NURS 3118, NURS 3119, NURS 3120, NURS 3121, NURS 3122, NURS 3123, NURS 3124, NURS 3125, NURS 4118, NURS 4124, NURS 4125, NURS 4126, NURS 4207.

NURS 4417. Community and Public Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

Roles and responsibilities of nurses in community and population-based health. Concepts of community, public health, and health policy affecting culturally diverse and vulnerable populations locally, nationally, and globally. Identifying community health needs and appropriate primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies. Restricted to students in the RN to BSN program.

NURS 6001. Clinical Experience in San Jose, Costa Rica. 0 Credits.

GW students work with nursing students and faculty from Universidad Hispanoamericana to provide basic health care, health screening, and patient education to children and adults in various community facilities and homes in San Jose, Costa Rica. Restricted to students enrolled in the School of Nursing.

NURS 6002. Clinical Experience in Quito, Ecuador. 0 Credits.

In collaboration with Universidad San Francisco de Quito, GW students work with local communities to provide basic health services and health education programs for adults and children in Quito and neighboring areas. Graduate students may have an opportunity to work with local physicians. Restricted to students enrolled in the School of Nursing who are fluent Spanish speakers.

NURS 6003. Clinical Experience in Mukono District, Uganda. 0 Credits.

In collaboration with GW partner Omni Med, students will focus on training volunteer community health workers to screen for hypertension and provide health education programs on topics such as maternal – child health, sanitation and nutrition in Mukono District, Uganda. Restricted to students enrolled in the School of Nursing.

NURS 6004. Clinical Experience in Thomonde, Haiti. 0 Credits.

Students and faculty from the GW's medical, physician assistant, and public health programs work in collaboration with partner organization Project Medishare to provide health services and education and disease prevention programs in rural clinics, schools, and villages in Thomonde, Haiti.

NURS 6005. Clinical Experience in Caracol, Haiti. 0 Credits.

In collaboration with health care providers from GW School of Nursing partner institution Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, South Korea, and SAE-A Trading Company Ltd., students provide basic health services, health screening and education, and disease prevention programs to individuals and communities attending the medical mission clinic in Caracol, Haiti. Restricted to students enrolled in the School of Nursing.

NURS 6006. Clinical Experience in Maribor, Slovenia. 0 Credits.

In collaboration with the University of Maribor in Slovenia, GW students work with community health care workers to deliver basic nursing care to selected populations in the community. Students have opportunities to research selected health problems and their impact on the health of individuals and communities in Maribor.

NURS 6181. Creativity and Innovation in Health Care. 3 Credits.

The theoretical conceptualizations and practical applications to promote creativity and innovation in generating ideas, identifying opportunities, and solving problems.

NURS 6202. Concepts in Population Health. 3 Credits.

Students integrate and synthesize concepts associated with quality, health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic health problems within communities, the general population, and specific population groups; issues related to culturally diverse and vulnerable populations.

NURS 6203. Nursing Leadership. 3 Credits.

Evidence-based leadership skills as a core competency in nursing to improve patient care quality and strengthen nursing as a profession; theories of leadership, personal leadership, skill building, team building techniques, change, conflict resolution, motivation, and communication skills.

NURS 6204. Health Information and Technology. 3 Credits.

Key issues and concepts related to the use of technology and information management to support the provision of high quality health care and outcomes.

NURS 6205. Health Policy, Quality, and Political Process. 3 Credits.

Health policy process and analysis relevant to the three main components of policy: cost, quality, and access.

NURS 6207. Evidence-Based Practice for Health Care Researchers. 3 Credits.

Methodological issues of health care research; knowledge and skills needed to critically appraise and synthesize research results and evidence-based methods.

NURS 6208. Biostatistics for Health Care Research. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts and modeling approaches used in biostatistics through the use of health care research data.

NURS 6215. Pediatric Adversity and Early Childhood Development and Health. 3 Credits.

How major adversity in childhood can weaken developing brain architecture and impact physical and mental health; the impact of poverty and other social determinants of health on child well-being over the life cycle.

NURS 6220. Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

System-focused advanced physiology and pathophysiology for analysis of health deviations across the life span.

NURS 6222. Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning. 4 Credits.

Nurse practitioner and nurse-midwifery students will acquire the knowledge, skills and clinical foundation for advanced health assessment and diagnostic reasoning in the ambulatory health care setting. This course is a prerequisite to all other clinical courses and includes a Campus Learning and Skills Intensive (CLASI).

NURS 6224. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner I: Practice Introduction. 4 Credits.

First clinical practicum course in the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner program; theoretical and practical foundations of common primary care conditions in the adult patient. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6225. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner II: Adolescent and Adult. 8 Credits.

Second clinical practicum course in the AGPCNP program. Synthesis and integration of advanced decision making skills including diagnostic reasoning and clinical judgment, health assessment, health promotion, technology, and evidence-based practice. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6224, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6227. Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum. 1-7 Credits.

Clinical practicum providing foundations of family primary care; focus on chronic health problems faced by families from culturally diverse backgrounds. Corequisites: NURS 6250, NURS 6251 and NURS 6252 Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6229. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner III: Adult, Older/Frail. 8 Credits.

Third clinical practicum course in the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner program; theoretical and evidence-based practice foundations for assessment and management of the patient across the aging continuum. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6224, NURS 6225, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6230. Family Nurse Practitioner I: Lifespan Primary Care/Diagnosis/Management. 4 Credits.

First clinically-based course for family nurse practitioners. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care focusing on common and chronic health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6231. Family Nurse Practitioner II: Lifespan Primary Care/Diagnosis/Management. 8 Credits.

Second clinically-based course for family nurse practitioners. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care focusing on common and chronic health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6230.

NURS 6232. Family Nurse Practitioner III: Professional Issues/Diagnosis/Management. 8 Credits.

Third clinically-based course for family nurse practitioner students. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care with a focus on common/chronic problems across the life span. Prerequisites: NURS 6231.

NURS 6233. Genetics for Health Care Providers. 3 Credits.

Basic scientific principles of genetics and their clinical applications.

NURS 6234. Advanced Pharmacology for Nursing. 3 Credits.

Pharmacologic concepts commonly seen in advanced practice nursing; major pharmacological classes for selected disease states and application in therapeutic decision making to encounters across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 6220.

NURS 6235. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner I: Introduction to Practice. 4 Credits.

First clinical course. Scientific underpinnings and practical management of complex acute and chronic conditions across spectrum of care delivery from subacute rehabilitation, to urgent care, emergency dept, hospital-based care and critical care. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6236. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner II: Complex and Acute Illness. 8 Credits.

Second clinical course in the adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner program. Management of complex, acute stable, and unstable conditions experienced by a variety of age groups from adolescents, to middle-aged adults, to the elderly. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234, and NURS 6235.

NURS 6237. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner III: Complex and Chronic Disease Mgt Adolesc/Elderly. 8 Credits.

Scientific underpinnings and practical management of complex acute and chronic conditions across a spectrum of care delivery situations from subacute rehabilitation, to urgent care, emergency department, hospital-based care, and critical care. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234, NURS 6235, and NURS 6236.

NURS 6241. The Health Care Enterprise. 3 Credits.

Overview of general management business principles related to health care systems; strategic management of patient-centered care delivery and strategic health care leadership. Same As: HSCI 6241.

NURS 6242. Psychopharmacology. 3 Credits.

Overview of the neurobiological and psychopharmacological principles for the clinical management of psychotropic medications in the treatment of mental illnesses across the lifespan; integrates neuroanatomy, pharmacogenomics, neurophysiology, pathophysiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and behavioral science. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6243. Addiction and Change. 3 Credits.

Principles of addiction and change with a focus on correlating how changes in behavior lead to recovery in addictions. Models of addiction and change, the neurobiology of addiction, behavior change theories and models, and treating addictions through behavioral mechanisms.

NURS 6244. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing with Families and Groups Across the Life Span. 3 Credits.

Theoretical and conceptual models related to the developmental and functional processes within family systems, therapy groups, and psychoeducation groups; PMHNP’s scope of practice as it relates to conducting family and group psychotherapy. Prerequisites: NURS 6242 and NURS 6245.

NURS 6245. Psychiatric/Mental Health Diagnostic Assessment Across the Lifespan. 4 Credits.

Theoretical and foundational knowledge for assessing, diagnosing, treating, and managing mental illnesses across the lifespan. Concurrent clinical practicum under supervision of preceptors and faculty. A minimum of 150 clinical hours are required. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, and NURS 6234.

NURS 6246. Psychiatric/Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing with Individuals Across the Life Span. 3 Credits.

Examines, analyzes, and evaluates treatment models and evidence-based interventions for the care of individuals living with acute and chronic mental illnesses across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6242 and NURS 6245.

NURS 6247. Population-Based Psychiatric/Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing Across the Life Span. 3 Credits.

Clinical practicum designed to build psychiatric-mental health NP skills in a variety of clinical settings. Integration of foundational knowledge from coursework to provide safe and competent behavioral healthcare to individuals across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6242, NURS 6244, NURS 6245, and NURS 6246.

NURS 6248. Integrated Application of Psychiatric/Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Credits.

Clinical practicum. Students develop competency in the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner role. Integration of foundational knowledge from coursework to provide safe and competent behavioral healthcare to individuals across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6242, NURS 6244, NURS 6245, NURS 6246, and NURS 6247.

NURS 6250. Family Nurse Practitioner I for Nurse Practitioners: Adult Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 2 Credits.

First clinically-based course for family nurse practitioners. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care focusing on prevention and common/chronic health problems across the lifespan. Corequisite: NURS 6227.

NURS 6251. Family Nurse Practitioner II for Nurse Practitioners: Lifespan Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 4 Credits.

Second clinically-based course for family nurse practitioners. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care focusing on common/chronic health problems across the lifespan. Corequisite: NURS 6227. Prerequisite: NURS 6250.

NURS 6252. Family Nurse Practitioner III for Nurse Practitioners: Lifespan Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 4 Credits.

Third theory course for family nurse practitioner students nationally certified in another APRN population. Covers common acute and chronic problems across the lifespan. Corequisite: NURS 6227. Prerequisites: NURS 6250, NURS 6251.

NURS 6258. Leadership Capstone Practicum I. 3 Credits.

First course in a two-semester mentored internship practicum. Students apply knowledge and refine abilities related to leadership in a setting and practice area mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor. Prerequisites: NURS 6202, NURS 6203, NURS 6204, NURS 6205, NURS 6207, NURS 6241, NURS 6274 and NURS 6295.

NURS 6259. Leadership Capstone Practicum II. 3 Credits.

Second course in a two-semester mentored internship practicum. Students apply knowledge and refine abilities related to leadership in a setting and practice area mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor. Prerequisite: NURS 6258.

NURS 6262. Leadership Coaching in Nursing. 3 Credits.

Client health coaching and leadership and management coaching; theoretical foundations, evidence for leadership coaching in nursing, and applications of coaching in nursing management.

NURS 6263. Teaching and Learning in Health Care. 3 Credits.

Application of instructional design methods to develop, deliver, and evaluate academic and professional health care curricula and education.

NURS 6264. Advancing Health Care Quality and Patient Safety. 3 Credits.

Application of the science of quality improvement, measurement and patient safety theories, models, methods, and tools to improve health care outcomes, cost and the patient and family experience of care in any health care setting.

NURS 6265. Advanced Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Physical Exam of Complex Adult and Geriatric Patients. 3 Credits.

System-focused physiology and pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment. Analysis of health deviations found in the complex adult and elderly population. Restricted to students in the School of Nursing.

NURS 6266. Geropsychiatric Considerations for Providers Caring for the Complex Adult and Geriatric Population. 3 Credits.

Examination of the psychiatric conditions commonly seen when caring for the complex adult and geriatric population. Treatment, management, and special considerations are presented. Restricted to students in the School of Nursing. Prerequisites: NURS 6265.

NURS 6267. Managing the Complex Adult and Geriatric in Long-Term Care. 3 Credits.

Provides a multidisciplinary background and science for healthcare quality management in long-term care. Restricted to students in the School of Nursing. Prerequisites: NURS 6265.

NURS 6268. Population Health and the Complex Adult and Geriatric Population. 3 Credits.

Students integrate and synthesize concepts associated with quality, health promotion, disease prevention, chronic health problems, and social determinants of health, specifically in the complex adult and geriatric population. Restricted to students in the School of Nursing.

NURS 6274. Health Economics and Finance. 3 Credits.

Health care economics, finance, and policy for effective management in a complex health care environment.

NURS 6282. Teaching and Learning in Health Care I: Foundations of Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Principles of instructional design. Active, authentic learning and assessment methods in academic and health care delivery settings; analyzing needs, defining objectives, and assessing outcomes for learning; strategies to support learner mastery.

NURS 6284. Teaching and Learning in Health Care III: Program and Curriculum Development. 3 Credits.

Design, development, implementation and evaluation of academic, clinical, and professional educational programs in nursing and other health professions; analysis and integration of national, professional and institutional policies, requirements, and standards to develop an outcomes-based curriculum.

NURS 6291. Special Topics. 4 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more details.

NURS 6297. Independent Study. 1-9 Credits.

NURS 6298. NP Clinical Completion. 1-5 Credits.

NURS 6299. Nurse Practitioner Technology Enhanced Community Health. 0 Credits.

Prepares students to integrate social determinants of health while using telehealth and digital health technologies to improve care for people living in rural and urban underserved communities.

NURS 8400. Epidemiology and Population Health. 3 Credits.

Integration of population and determinants of health with epidemiological principles. Examination and application of biostatistical and epidemiological methods of analysis. Restricted to students in DNP program. Prerequisites: NURS 6208.

NURS 8401. Organizational Concepts in Nursing. 3 Credits.

Health care delivery systems, the nurse’s role in interprofessional/interdisciplinary teams, and organizational development from a nursing perspective.

NURS 8402. Knowledge Management in Nursing. 3 Credits.

The use of knowledge management and information technology as it applies to health care; strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care with the use of technology.

NURS 8403. Translating Research into Practice. 3 Credits.

Models and processes of evidence-based practice, strategies to translate evidence into practice, and tools useful for promoting practices in health care settings.

NURS 8405. Health Care Quality Improvement. 3 Credits.

Multidisciplinary background for the science of healthcare quality management; concepts, principles, and philosophy of quality improvement.

NURS 8407. Grant Writing. 3 Credits.

NURS 8410. Executive Presence I. 2 Credits.

NURS 8411. Executive Presence II. 2 Credits.

This is a continuation of Executive Presence I. In this course, the student will examine power shifts in leadership, revisit change as a stimulus for innovation, participate in an interactive session for individuals who can practice communicating their practicum proposals and receiving friendly feedback and constructive input from their peers, and re-evaluate the leadership development plan designed in Executive Presence I.

NURS 8412. HC Finance for Nurse Leaders. 3 Credits.

NURS 8413. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: Advanced Role Immersion. 3 Credits.

Students develop and integrate bedside with systems and population level competencies; role development, leadership, interdisciplinary collaboration, systems management, and evidenced-based practice are discussed and applied to concurrent clinical experiences; independent practice skills in the context of interdisciplinary teams. Prerequisites: NURS 6235, NURS 6236 and NURS 6237. Recommended background: prior enrollment in NURS 6220, NURS 6234 and NURS 6222.

NURS 8416. Entrepreneurship for Nurse Leaders. 3 Credits.

Various aspects of entrepreneurship in the context of the nursing profession.

NURS 8417. Health Policy and Analysis. 3 Credits.

Application of evidence based methods, policy frameworks, cost effectiveness, and cost benefit analysis related to current policy issues.

NURS 8418. Health Care Economics, Finance, and Reimbursement. 3 Credits.

Application of economic concepts to health care financing and reimbursement policy; the effects of historical, current, and emerging models of financing on quality, access, and cost.

NURS 8419. Analytical Methods and Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Credits.

Examination of the merits of common methods and designs for evidence-based practice and practice inquiry. Acquire skills in searching for, critically appraising and grading evidence. Synthesis of research findings to develop practice recommendations. Restricted to students in DNP program. Prerequisites: NURS 6208.

NURS 8420. The Health Policy Process. 3 Credits.

The impact of governmental structures and processes on health policy, access, quality, and cost; the role of nurses in shaping health system change.

NURS 8421. The Legislative and Judicial Processes and Health Policy. 3 Credits.

Health policy legislation and the role of the judiciary. Students develop briefing materials, provide verbal or written testimony, give public comments regarding proposed bills, and assess impact of policy-oriented boards. Includes visits to Capitol Hill or state capitals.

NURS 8422. Health Policy Practicum. 3 Credits.

Students collaborate with a policy expert in a professional organization, government agency, advocacy group, or other entity to develop policy on a specific issue related to cost, quality, or access relevant to patient experience of care.

NURS 8423. The Regulatory Process and Health Policy. 3 Credits.

Knowledge and skills for analyzing rulemaking and regulatory processes that affect health-related issues; workforce scopes of practice; safety of the public; and roles and influence of federal agencies and private organizations charged with implementing newly passed legislation.

NURS 8430. Determinants of Health. 3 Credits.

Determinants of health in the United States. Structural factors that promote and impede health and health equity explored through an ecological lens. Examination of research and implementation science to address the determinants of health.

NURS 8440. Philosophy of Science and Theories. 4 Credits.

Philosophy of science and scientific methodology in historical context; competing philosophical viewpoints about the nature of scientific knowledge and the implication for knowledge development in nursing science; theoretical foundations of research studies. Restricted to Majors Only.

NURS 8441. Statistics for Health Care Research I. 3 Credits.

Intermediate-level statistics applicable to the analysis of health care data.

NURS 8442. Statistics for Health Care Research II. 3 Credits.

Advanced statistical methods commonly used in health care research. Analysis and interpretation of healthcare data using a variety of statistical techniques, including simple and multiple linear, linear-mixed effects, logistic, and Poisson regression, repeated measures designs, and survival analysis.

NURS 8443. Research Program Development Seminar I. 2 Credits.

Foundational content related to the conduct of research, including research ethics, data management, and modes of new knowledge dissemination. Ethical and other influences that impact the development, implementation, and sharing of discovery science.

NURS 8444. Research Program Development Seminar II. 1 Credit.

Introduction to select professional roles and guidance on preparation for associated responsibilities; forming an effective research team; generating meaningful and impactful scholarship.

NURS 8445. Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Research Designs. 3 Credits.

Formulation of research questions, hypotheses, measurement, sampling, data collection, and statistical approaches for various experimental and quasi-experimental research designs.

NURS 8446. Qualitative Research Design. 3 Credits.

Qualitative methods and designs applicable to translational health science research problems; qualitative epistemology, methods, data collection, and data analysis. Credit cannot be earned for this course and THS 8123.

NURS 8447. Measurement for Health Care Research. 3 Credits.

Measurement theories, principles, and techniques essential for the development and analysis of assessment instruments used in health care research; reliability and validity analysis, generalizability theory, item analysis, linking and scaling procedures, and adjustments for measurement error.

NURS 8448. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 3 Credits.

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and their relative utility in answering research questions; formulating questions, defining criteria for including or excluding studies, methods for data extraction, grading the risk for various kinds of bias, and performing a meta-analysis.

NURS 8449. Non-Experimental Research Design. 3 Credits.

Evaluation of secondary data analysis, surveys, case-control studies, cohort studies, and mixed methods approaches.

NURS 8450. Research Rotation. 2 Credits.

Participatory research experience where students and faculty members interact on research-related activities; data collection, data management, data analysis, table and figure preparation, and abstract development.

NURS 8451. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

Practical experience in an area designated as necessary for additional content expertise, such as systematic review of the literature, survey development, secondary data acquisition and cleaning, or data collection. Student will conduct preliminary research activities in support of the dissertation research. Restricted to doctoral candidates.

NURS 8452. Team Science and Collaboration. 3 Credits.

Measuring team effectiveness by integrating team science, cross-disciplinary research, and methodology; developing research designs to address complex health science problems; and team science and science of team science approaches to promoting team effectiveness. (Same as THS 8103, HSCI 6285)

NURS 8453. Leadership and Health Policy. 3 Credits.

Introduction to integration of health policy and leadership concepts in the use and analysis of research affecting systems and populations; exploration of social, political, and economic principles and theories as they relate to the incorporation of policy analysis and implementation.

NURS 8454. Proposal Development Seminar. 2 Credits.

Faculty supervision and ongoing peer feedback for development of the dissertation proposal.

NURS 8455. Dissertation. 1-5 Credits.

Culminating research experience for students in the PhD in nursing program. Following defense of dissertation proposal, students design and implement a research study, analyze data, and interpret and contextualize findings. Restricted to PhD students in the School of Nursing.

NURS 8489. DNP Project Scholarly Inquiry. 3 Credits.

Development of scholarly writing skills, exploration of a phenomenon of interest, and development of skills needed for the responsible conduct of translation of research into practice. Students identify a scholarly topic addressing a practice issue. Restricted to students in DNP program.

NURS 8490. DNP Project Planning. 3 Credits.

Foundational knowledge to support the student in creating a DNP project proposal that includes a project plan, implementation, and evaluation plan. Students identify a practice issue, develop a DNP project plan, and formulate a scholarly project development process. Prerequisite: NURS 8403.

NURS 8491. DNP Project Implementation. 3 Credits.

Implementation of DNP project using leadership, project management, and team building skills. Restricted to DNP students. Prerequisite: NURS 8490.

NURS 8492. DNP Project Evaluation and Dissemination. 3 Credits.

Data collection and evaluation of results from the DNP project using rigorous evaluation criteria and outcome measures. Restricted to DNP students. Prerequisite: NURS 8491.