School of Nursing

Dean P. Jeffries
Assistant/Associate Deans for Programs  K. Malliarakis, P. Slaven-Lee, B. Tebbenhoff

Established in 2010, the George Washington University School of Nursing (GW Nursing) has a proven record of innovation, entrepreneurship, and leadership. GW Nursing educates and inspires nurses to provide high quality, compassionate, person-centered health care. It develops leaders who actively engage in health promotion, patient advocacy, and health care innovation, and prepares nurse educators to pursue quality and advance the profession.

GW Nursing programs include the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and multiple certificate programs. These programs emphasize the integration of nursing practice, research, and policy with a strong focus on solving practical problems. This approach promotes strong nursing practice and leadership skills in GW Nursing graduates.

Mission

The mission of GW Nursing is to:

  • Inspire nurses to provide high quality, compassionate health care.
  • Transform health care through innovative education, research, policy, and practice.
  • Develop entrepreneurial leaders and educators who pursue quality and advance the profession.
  • Improve the health and well-being of people and communities locally, nationally, and globally.
  • Encourage lifelong learning, and its students' advance nursing practice, policy, and education as they make a difference in the world.

In doing so, GW Nursing builds on the University mission and core values.

Vision

GW Nursing will drive innovation and improvements in health care worldwide through the education of compassionate nurses, esteemed educators and researchers, entrepreneurial leaders, and influential policy experts. 

Accreditation

The George Washington University is accredited by its regional accrediting agency, the MiddleStates Association of Colleges and Schools. GW Nursing's BSN, MSN, and DNP programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The BSN program has been granted full approval by the Virginia Board of Nursing (BON) and is currently in compliance with all BON regulations.

Admission

Financial Regulations

Health and Safety

Academic Regulations

Clinical and Practicum Policies


Admission

To be considered for admission to any GW Nursing program, an applicant must complete the Nursing's Centralized Application Service (NCAS) application. Applicants are required to pay an application fee for NCAS; the NCAS fee will vary based on the number of programs for which the applicant applies. Official transcripts must be submitted to NCAS from each academic institution attended, regardless of whether credit was earned.

Detailed application information is available on the GW Nursing website. Applicants should refer to the individual program descriptions for information on prerequisites and supporting documents, since these vary by program. It is the responsibility of applicants to ensure that all required application materials are submitted by the designated deadlines. Unofficial copies, facsimiles, or photocopies of transcripts, certificates, or diplomas will not be accepted. All records become the property of GW Nursing and will not be returned. In addition, all admitted students must complete a criminal background check prior to matriculation. Criminal background checks and drug screen are conducted through CastleBranch©

Criminal Background Check and Urine Drug Screen

Following admission, new students must complete a criminal background check and urine drug screen prior to the first day of their first term.  These services are supplied by Castle Branch. Instructions for completing this requirement are provided upon admission. Clinical sites may require that students complete the site’s own screening for criminal background and drugs.

Conditional Admission

Admission with conditions may be offered at the discretion of the admissions committee and the Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program. The terms of admission are outlined in the letter of admission from GW Nursing. All admitted students must complete a criminal background check prior to matriculation. Criminal background checks and drug screen are conducted through CastleBranch©. Students matriculating in clinical programs, must also complete the pre-clinical requirements outlined in the Clinical Compliance Management section of the GW Nursing Bulletin.

Advance Tuition Deposit

Upon notification of admission, the student will be required to submit a Declaration of Intent to enroll along with an advance tuition deposit of $500. The deposit is credited toward tuition and is not refundable. Failure to pay this deposit may result in the revocation of a student’s admission offer.

International Applicants

International applicants should refer to the GW Bulletin for policies related international applicants. The following additional requirements pertain to international applicants to GW Nursing:

Language Tests

Applicants whose native language is not English or who are not citizens of countries where English is an official language must submit official test scores from either TOEFL or academic IELTS. The following are the minimum scores for admission consideration:

  • TOEFL: 600 on paper-based; 100 on Internet-based
  • Academic IELTS: an overall band score of 7.0, with no individual band score below 6.0

The language test requirement may be waived for applicants who hold a degree from an accredited college or university located in a country in which English is the official language and also the language of instruction at the institution.

US Citizens Living Abroad

GW Nursing welcomes applications from United States citizens living abroad. Students living abroad are required to attend all simulation-based learning events on campus that are included in the plan of study. Nurse Practitioner students living abroad are expected to complete required clinical hours with a minimum of 3 different clinical preceptors. Clinical and practicum placements must be approved by the Program Director and the Assistant Dean for the MSN or DNP Program. Students who fail to meet clinical objectives may be required to travel to the U.S. for additional remediation and supervision prior to program completion.

Non-Degree Seeking Students

A student who wishes to take individual courses at GW Nursing must obtain permission to register as a non-degree seeking student. Application is made to the GW Nursing Office of Enrollment Management and Student Services. The Office of Enrollment Management and Student Services, in conjunction with the appropriate Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program, will determine whether the applicant will be granted permission to register as a non-degree seeking student. Permission to take individual courses, if granted, will generally be limited to a total of 6 credits, excluding the GW Nursing-offered undergraduate prerequisite courses.

Readmission

Students who were previously registered in a GW Nursing program but did not register during the immediately preceding semester (summer sessions excluded) must apply for readmission. Students who have attended other academic institutions while not enrolled at GW Nursing must have official transcripts sent directly to the GW Nursing Office of Enrollment Management and Student Services from each institution attended. Applications for readmission are considered on the basis of regulations currently in effect.

Transfer Credit

Undergraduate Students

Advanced standing may be awarded for appropriate coursework completed at other accredited institutions provided minimum grade requirements have been met. The minimum acceptable grade is ‘C’ for coursework to be applied toward an undergraduate degree. GW Nursing reserves the right to refuse transfer credit in part or in whole or to allow credit provisionally.

Graduate Students

Up to 6 credits of coursework may be accepted as transfer credit for graduate students provided the coursework was completed within the past five years at an accredited college or university with a minimum grade of B. A limited amount of additional transfer credit may be approved upon petition to the Assistant Dean for the MSN or DNP Program. The University reserves the right to refuse transfer credit in part or in whole or to allow credit provisionally. Students’ completing the GW Nursing’s accelerated BSN will have up to 12 credits applied to the MSN or DNP program at GW Nursing. The completed credits are eligible to be used for GW Nursing 's graduate program, for a period not to exceed five years.

Degree candidates who are currently enrolled at this institution and plan to take courses at other accredited institutions for transfer credit must secure pre-approval by the Assistant Dean for the MSN or DNP Program and the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Technical and Academic Standards for Nursing Students

GW Nursing is committed to preparing knowledgeable, safe and ethical nurses and nurse practitioners who are able to think critically. These individuals must be able to perform the necessary skills to provide high quality effective and efficient care for patients in a rapidly evolving health care system across a variety of practice environments. Students at all levels are required to master the essential competencies for practice as enumerated via the relevant professional national standards. In addition, all students must have sufficient capabilities and abilities in the following: Communication, Observation, Motor/tactile Function, Cognitive/Intellectual Function, and Behavioral and Social Attributes.

  • Communication includes the ability to speak, hear, read, write and document sufficiently to achieve an accurate and adequate exchange of information with other health care professionals, patients and their support network. The student must:
  • Have the ability to receive and process auditory information, and speak and write clearly in English in all communications with patients, their families, and other health care professionals.
  • Be able to communicate effectively through written, phone and electronic media.
  • Be able to communicate sensitively with patients and their families.
  • Be able to read sufficiently to comprehend complex medical literature, and convey this information in easy to understand terms.
  • Possess the ability to perceive forms of non-verbal interpersonal communications including facial expressions, body language, and affect.
  • Observation includes the ability to perceive, using senses and mental abilities, information presented in both educational and clinical settings. Educational information will be presented through lectures, small groups and one-on-one interactions, as well as in written and audiovisual materials. The student must:
  • Possess sufficient sensory (visual, auditory, tactile, and olfactory) and mental abilities to accurately perceive information provided in the educational settings. This includes written and audiovisual materials, diagnostic images, microscopic images and physical examination.
  • Be able to accurately observe (using visual, auditory, tactile, and/or olfactory senses) a patient’s medical condition, including patient affect, up close and at a distance, with and without medical instrumentation. This includes but is not limited to direct physical examination, radiography, electrocardiograms, sonograms, monitors and other graphic images.
  • Be able to accurately perceive pain, pressure, temperature, position, vibration and movement relevant to the patient’s condition.

Motor/Tactile Function includes the ability to physically move in close proximity at multiple heights around the patient in order to fully employ tactile and other sensory capacities accurately. The student must:

  • Possess sufficient motor function to directly perform palpation, percussion, auscultation, and other diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers.
  • Be able to execute movements reasonably required to provide general and emergency medical care to patients. These skills require coordination of fine and gross motor skills, equilibrium and functional sensation.
  • Possess the capability to manipulate equipment and instruments for the performance of basic examination and laboratory tests and procedures.
  • Be able to move oneself from one setting to another and negotiate the patient care environment in a timely fashion that is safe for both patient and student.
  • Be able to lift a minimum of 10 pounds, sufficient to assess a newborn, lift or provide range of motion to a patient’s extremity, or ascertain patient’s motor reflexes
  • Possess sufficient physical stamina to perform the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study. This includes long periods of sitting, standing and moving which are required for classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. Programs requiring lengthy numbers of clinical hours expect students to provide 8 to 12 hour stretches of time working with patients with minimal periods of inactivity.
  • Cognitive/Intellectual Function includes the capacity to seek and process information sensitively, accurately and efficiently from patients, their families and other health providers. The student must:
  • Be able to retain and recall through short and long term memory the details of patients’ history, physical and presenting complaint.
  • Possess the ability to process and synthesize patient information in an accurate and timely way to assess, diagnose, identify and initiate next steps in the patient’s treatment and management.

Demonstrate cognitive and problem solving skills in an efficient and timely manner in order to meet the Program Competencies. Problem solving is one of the critical skills demanded of nurses and advanced practice registered nurses. It includes the following abilities:

  • Comprehension of visual-spatial relationships.
  • Reading and understanding the medical literature and the patient’s chart.
  • Learning, measuring, calculating, retrieving, prioritizing, analyzing, organizing, assimilating, integrating, and synthesizing technically detailed and complex information and applying this information appropriately.

Behavioral and Social Attributes includes sufficient awareness, insight and emotional self-control to place the needs of the patients and their families first. The student must:

  • Possess emotional stability for full utilization of her/his intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to both didactic studies and patient care.
  • Be able to develop mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and their family members, staff and colleagues.
  • Demonstrate being able to work collaboratively and effectively as a small group member, as a health team member and as a team leader.
  • Possess sufficient interpersonal skills to relate positively with people across society, including all ethnic backgrounds, economic levels, sexual orientation, and belief systems.
  • Possess compassion and concern for others; interest in and motivation for service, and integrity.
  • Be able to put the patient, their family and the health care team ahead of their own needs, values and beliefs to meet the patient’s beliefs, values, and preferences.
  • Be able to function effectively under mentally and emotionally stressful situations.
  • Demonstrate ability to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility, and function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients.
  • Behave in an ethical and moral manner that is consistent with professional values, rather than allowing their own needs and beliefs to restrict the patient’s options.
  • Be able to accept constructive criticism and appropriately respond through modification of her/his behavior.
  • Accommodations for disability: Reasonable accommodations will be made for applicants with disabilities who can meet the requirements noted above after review by the GW Office of Disabilities Services. These accommodations must be accomplished without altering the essential requirements of the nursing curriculum. Inability to meet the technical standards throughout program enrollment will necessitate further review which may delay or terminate progression and/or enrollment in the program.
  • Any need for special accommodations must be addressed specifically by the student with the GW Office of Disability Services. Only the GW Office of Disability Services can recommend accommodations or state the specific accommodations that faculty members will provide. coursework undertaken prior to the student’s application and approval for special accommodation is not subject to special accommodation. Such accommodations are not applied retroactive to completion of that process.

Financial Regulations

GW Nursing adopted the following financial regulations for the academic year 2017-2018. Costs are expected to increase in subsequent years.

University Fees and Financial and Regulations 

The following regulations apply to all GW students. Visit the University Financial Fees and Regulations website for additional information. Note that other fees and regulations included therein may not apply to students in the GW Nursing.

Drop-Refund Schedule

Drop-Refund schedule for on-campus students (BSN only):

Withdrawal Percentage
On or before the end of the first week of classes 90%
On or before the end of the second week of classes 60%
On or before the end of the third week of classes 40%
On or before the end of the fourth week of classes 25%
After the fourth week of classes None

Drop-Refund schedule for off-campus students (online only):

Withdrawal Percentage
On or before the end of the second week of classes 90%
On or before the end of the fourth week of classes 50%
After the fourth week of classes None

GW Nursing State Requirements

Tuition Refund for Oregon Residents Taking Online Courses Only 

Oregon residents enrolled in an online education course are allowed a modified tuition refund policy in order to meet Oregon State Mandate OAR 583-030-0035(18)(c). An Oregon student who withdraws from an online course is eligible for a partial refund through the middle week of the term.  Refunds are based on unused instructional time and are prorated on a weekly basis. Students must be current residents of Oregon at the time of course registration and withdrawal to be eligible for this modified refund policy.

Fall and Spring term (15 week), Oregon Residents:

Withdrawal Percentage
During the first week of classes 100%
On or before the end of the second week of classes 87%
On or before the end of the third week of classes 80%
On or before the end of the fourth week of classes 74%
On or before the end of the fifth week of classes 67%
On or before the end of the sixth week of classes 60%
On or before the end of the seventh week of classes 50%
On or before the end of the eighth week of classes 50%
After the eighth week of classes None

Summer term (10 week), Oregon Residents: 

Withdrawal Refund
During the first week of classes 100%
On or before the end of the second week of classes 80%
On or before the end of the third week of classes 70%
On or before the end of the fourth week of classes 60%
On or before the end of the fifth week of classes 50%
After the fifth week of classes None

Refund policies of the University are in conformity with guidelines for refunds adopted by the American Council on Education. Federal regulations require that financial aid recipients use such refunds to repay financial aid received for that semester’s attendance. This policy applies to institutional aid as well.

In no case will tuition be reduced or refunded because of absence from classes. Authorization to withdraw and certification for work done will not be given to a student who does not have a clear financial record.

Financial Aid

GW offers financial assistance to all eligible students from a variety of resources. Undergraduate aid consists of two basic types: awards for academic achievement or talent without reference to financial circumstances (merit scholarships) and scholarships, grants, loans, and employment based on academic achievement and demonstrated financial need. GW Nursing scholarships are only applicable to tuition and must be accepted for the term in which they were offered. Scholarships cannot be deferred to future semesters.

Gift aid (scholarships, grants, fellowships, assistantships, etc.) is taxable to the extent that it exceeds the allowable costs of tuition, fees, and required books and supplies or is dedicated to other costs, such as room and board. Federal grants may be taxable if, together with other gift assistance, they exceed the allowable costs. In the case of a student who is awarded tuition scholarships, grants, or awards from more than one source, the combined amount cannot exceed tuition charges; institutional aid will be adjusted to this limit.

In general, consideration for financial aid is restricted to students in good academic standing who are at least half-time and meet the minimum grade-point average for particular awards and are not financially encumbered by any other University office. Applications for institutional or federal aid cannot be processed if the relevant tax returns have not been filed in accordance with the IRS Code. Documents submitted as part of aid applications become the property of GW and cannot be returned. Federal regulations require that GW report suspected cases of fraud or misrepresentation to the appropriate federal, state, and local authorities.

Information on financial aid is assumed to be accurate at the time the current academic year Bulletin is published. Future changes in federal regulations or institutional policies may alter the application requirements or program guidelines.

Health and Safety

Health and Accident Insurance

All GW students are required to have health and accident insurance. Students who fail to maintain such insurance may be placed on Leave of Absence without tuition refund. Undergraduate students are automatically enrolled in GW's student health insurance program. Students who have acquired their own insurance must provide the required information to be waived from the program and have this item removed from their bill. Graduate students must submit verification of health insurance coverage to the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team.

Immunization Requirements

It is the law in the District of Columbia that all students under the age of 26 have a record on file with GW Medical Services documenting immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella (two immunizations with the initial dose given after the first birthday or positive titers), varicella (chickenpox—by immunization, documented history of disease, or positive titers), hepatitis B series, meningococcal vaccine (or meningitis waiver), and a current tetanus/diphtheria booster (within 10 years prior to the beginning of the semester).

In addition, the School of Nursing requires all clinical students to submit verification of health and immunization status prior to commencing any clinical coursework. All undergraduate and graduate students in clinical programs must submit the required documentation to Castle Branch. All students must have a hepatitis screening test (see immunization policy).  Students are responsible for providing proof of immunity to measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella by titer. Students must show documentation of TdaP (Tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) within the past seven years. Skin testing for tuberculosis exposure (PPD) is required on an annual basis. Annual influenza Immunization is required. GW Medical Services is available to provide any needed inoculations on a fee-for-service basis.

Undergraduate students who have not provided proof of necessary immunization by the end of the second week of classes may be removed from classes and will not be permitted to register for the subsequent semester until such proof is provided. Graduate students are not permitted to enroll in clinical courses without completion of immunization requirements.

Verification of Health Status

GW Nursing requires for all students to complete a full physical examination within 12 months prior to the beginning of clinical courses.

Compliance with HIPAA Guidelines

The sites at which students pursue their clinical experience must comply with federal guidelines for the education of employees regarding prevention of the spread of blood borne pathogens and patient privacy; therefore, such sites require that all students provide evidence of relevant annual training. Students must complete the required university module on HIPAA.

Academic Regulations

In order to graduate, undergraduate and graduate students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in courses during their degree program. 

Undergraduate

A minimum grade of is required in clinical courses and a minimum grade of C is required in didactic courses.  

Graduate

A minimum grade of B is required in clinical courses and in NURS 6220, NURS 6234, and NURS 6222, and a minimum grade of C is required in other didactic courses.  

Although transfer credit may be assigned, courses taken at other institutions are not considered in computing the GPA.  CR (Credit); AU (Audit) P (Pass); NP (No Pass); I (Incomplete); IPG (In Progress); W (Authorized Withdrawal); and Z (Unauthorized Withdrawal).

Technical and Software Requirements 

Many GW Nursing programs are taught in whole or in part online. Students enrolled in such programs must have specified hardware and software.

Procedures on the Evaluation of Professional Comportment

Students enrolled in GW Nursing programs are required to conform to all rules, regulations, and policies outlined within the GW Bulletin. In addition to the GW Bulletin, GW Nursing students must adhere to the regulations outlined below.

Evaluation of Professional Comportment

As members of the health care community, GW Nursing students are expected to behave in a manner consistent with the principles and obligations inherent to professional practice. Some behaviors or patterns, either during the didactic or clinical phase, may raise concerns as to the student’s suitability to continue in the program of study. Inappropriate behaviors for a nursing student may include, but are not limited to, breaching patient confidentiality, using illegal drugs or abusing controlled substances, becoming sexually involved with a patient, undertaking a procedure or scope of practice beyond that of a student, disobeying or showing disrespect for others, threatening verbal or physical behavior toward others—including students, faculty or patients—showing a judgmental attitude toward patients, or revealing a lack of concern or compassion in practice. The process described below is intended to address behaviors that are unacceptable to GW Nursing and raise questions about the student’s fitness for the practice of nursing.

When a problem with professional comportment (other than academic dishonesty) regarding a student is perceived, the observer will communicate this concern to the relevant Program Director. If the communication is verbal, it must be confirmed immediately by a signed written statement or else it will not be pursued further. Upon receiving such a communication, the Program Director will create a confidential file in which all documents pertaining to the matter will be placed. The contents of the file will be preserved for a period of time not less than five (5) years from the date of separation or graduation from GW Nursing. Access to this file will be restricted to the student under consideration, the Program Director, the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program, the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, the Dean, the Assistant Dean of Enrollment Management and Student Services, and his/her staff, the GW Nursing Ad Hoc Committee, if one is constituted, and attorneys for GW and the student.

The Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will notify the student in writing that s/he has received a communication from an individual who perceives that the student has a problem with professional comportment. The notice will include a copy of these Procedures. The Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will meet informally with the student as soon as possible. At that meeting, or as soon thereafter as possible, the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program may do one or more of the following:

  • Advise the student.
  • Recommend that the student seek professional assistance, at the student's expense.
  • Gather additional information through contacts with the student, his/her peers, faculty, professional consultants, and/or any other source deemed to have relevant information. With the student's concurrence, s/he may be referred for a medical, psychiatric, and/or psychological evaluation. With student consent, the written report from the health care provider will be included in the student case file.
  • Refer the case to a GW Nursing Ad Hoc Committee (“Ad Hoc Committee”).

An Ad Hoc Committee and its Chair will be named by the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program The Ad Hoc Committee, including the Chair, will consist of three GW Nursing faculty members and the Assistant Dean for Enrollment Management and Student Services. The Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will notify the student, in writing, of the composition of the Ad Hoc Committee. The student will be allowed ten (10) calendar days from the mailing of this notice to object to any person's appointment to the Ad Hoc Committee. Such objection must be sent to the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program in writing. Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will, at his/her sole discretion, determine whether an objection warrants the appointment of one or more different persons to the Ad Hoc Committee. The Ad Hoc Committee will investigate the allegation. The Ad Hoc Committee will review the student's confidential file and interview him or her.

The student under review and/or the student's advisor may attend the information gathering sessions. The information gathering sessions will be transcribed. The student and/or his or her advisor may submit written questions to be answered by persons interviewed by the Ad Hoc Committee, but the procedure regarding their questioning is left to the sole discretion of the Ad Hoc Committee, including whether the questions submitted by the student and/or his or her advisor will be modified and/or posed to the persons interviewed. The student also may suggest persons to be interviewed by the Ad Hoc Committee, but the decision to interview such persons is left to the sole discretion of the Ad Hoc Committee. The student may speak on his/her behalf and may submit other material. The student’s advisor may not speak. The materials and/or testimony to be considered and the weight to be given to them are left to the sole discretion of the Ad Hoc Committee. . The student and the student's advisor cannot be present when the Ad Hoc Committee meets in executive session.

Meetings of the Ad Hoc Committee are confidential. Minutes of the Ad Hoc Committee will be placed in the student's confidential file upon the completion of the Ad Hoc Committee’s review. The Chair and all members will be required to be present for all meetings of the Ad Hoc Committee. The Ad Hoc Committee will make its final recommendation(s) to the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program. Such recommendation(s) will be in writing and shall include findings of fact and the reasons for the recommendation(s). There is no required format for the recommendation(s). The content of the recommendation(s), including the nature and specificity of the findings and reasons, is left to the sole discretion of the Ad Hoc Committee. The Chair may review and sign the final recommendation(s) on behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee. The recommendation(s) could include, but is (are) not limited to, one or more of the following:

  • Advising the student.
  • Recommending that the student seek professional assistance, at the student's expense.
  • Recommending conditions with which the student must comply in order to continue in GW Nursing.
  • Recommending suspension from GW Nursing
  • Recommending dismissal from GW Nursing.

The Ad Hoc Committee must agree that its recommendation(s) is (are) supported by a preponderance of the evidence (more likely than not). The Ad Hoc Committee shall make an additional recommendation regarding whether the confidential file will be made part of the student's permanent academic file.

The Ad Hoc Committee will forward its recommendation(s) to the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

The Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs will review the student's confidential file and the recommendation(s) of the Ad Hoc Committee. The Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, at his/her sole discretion, may meet with the student prior to making his/her determination.

The Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs will take whatever action s/he deems appropriate, including dismissal of the student from GW Nursing. The Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs will inform the student in writing of his/her decision.

The student shall have fifteen (15) calendar days in which to appeal the decision of the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. Such appeal shall be in writing sent to the GW Nursing Dean. The scope of this appeal is limited to the Dean or his/her designee’s determination as to whether the procedures set forth in these Procedures have been complied with. Failure to appeal the decision shall be deemed a waiver of any and all rights to challenge the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs decision and shall be deemed an acceptance of the decision.

The Dean or his/her designee will make his/her decision in the written record of the proceedings. His/her decision shall be final. At any time during the process, if the student in question selects an attorney as his or her advisor, GW will have its attorney present. The student, therefore, is required to inform the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program seven (7) days in advance of the hearing if counsel is to be present.

Evaluation of Academic Performance

Faculty members are responsible for evaluating the performance of students in a meaningful, useful, and timely manner and for assigning grades on a basis that is rational, just, and unbiased. The authority for assignment of grades rests with faculty members in the respective programs.

Appeal Procedures for Cases of Alleged Improper Academic Evaluation

Students who believe that a grade or evaluation is unjust or inaccurate may submit a petition to the appropriate Program Director. If a mutually satisfactory resolution is not achieved, the student may use the following appeal procedures:

  • The student must submit a written appeal to the Associate/Assistant Dean for the program within five (5) days of notification of decision from the Program Director.
  • The Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will meet with the student to attempt to resolve the issue.
  • If the issue cannot be resolved, the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program will form a three-person special committee Grade Appeal Committee). The Grade Appeal Committee will consist of three (3) members of the GW Nursing faculty.
  • The Grade Appeal Committee will conduct a hearing at which the student and the faculty member have an opportunity to state their views on the academic evaluation at issue.
  • The Grade Appeal Committee will make a recommendation to the Assistant/Associate Dean for the program regarding how the issue should be resolved. The Assistant/Associate Dean for the program shall make the final decision regarding the grade appeal and will advise the student and the faculty member in writing of his or her decision.

Academic Standing

An enrolled student is considered to be in good academic standing by GW Nursing provided that he or she is not on probation nor been dismissed.

Academic Probation

Any undergraduate student whose cumulative GPA is below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and will receive a probation letter from the Associate Dean for the BSN Program, with a copy to the Program Director, student’s advisor, and the Office of Enrollment Management and Student Services. While on probation, the student will be allowed to register for no more than 13 credits per semester, unless approved by the Program Director and Associate Dean for the BSN Program.

Any graduate student who’s cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and will receive a probation letter from the Assistant Dean for the MSN or DNP Program, with a copy to the Program Director, student’s advisor, and Office of Enrollment Management and Student Services. 

Progression

In undergraduate programs, any grade below a C in didactic courses, or below a B in clinical courses, is not satisfactory and the student will not be permitted to progress as planned under the original program of study. The student will have a new program of study as recommended by the student’s advisor and the Program Director. An unsatisfactory grade on a second attempt is grounds for dismissal. Any undergraduate student who earns a grade below a B in a clinical course will not progress in the clinical portion of the program until that course is successfully completed. BSN students who are absent from their program for one semester or more, regardless of the reason, is required to be reexamined on clinical competencies before resuming their studies. BSN students must complete their program of study in no more than six (6) semesters of enrollment, excluding leaves of absence.

In graduate programs, any grade below a C in didactic courses or less than B in clinical courses, NURS 6220, NURS 6234, and NURS 6222 is not satisfactory. A student receiving an unsatisfactory grade may attempt a course a second time; an unsatisfactory grade on a second attempt is grounds for dismissal. Any graduate student who earns a grade below a B in a clinical course will not progress in the clinical portion of the program until that course is successfully completed. Both grades remain on the student's transcript and are calculated in the final GPA. Graduate students must complete their degree program within six (6) years.

Dismissal

Any student who has received one or more unsatisfactory grades or violates professional comportment as outlined previously, during a semester may be recommended for dismissal by the Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program. This will be reviewed by the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The final decision regarding dismissal will be made by the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Independent Study

The purpose of an independent study is to increase the student's exposure to and involvement in nursing research or practice under the direction of a faculty mentor. The student is responsible for identifying and initiating a contract with a faculty member involved in, or who has expertise in, their practice or research project area. Input from the student’s advisor is required before the plan for independent study is finalized. The faculty mentor for an independent study must be qualified to teach at the appropriate level (doctoral for doctoral degrees), have expertise in the area of the independent study focus, and is an associate or regular member of the faculty. The faculty mentor can academically supervise the independent study while the student works with the non-regular faculty. The student and faculty mentor must establish mutually agreed upon objectives and evaluation criteria. The agreement is recorded in an independent study contract, and a signed copy is forwarded to the Assistant Dean of the student’s program. Credit for independent study can vary from one to three credits per semester, depending on the program, nature of the objectives, and requirements. Credit value is calculated as 50 to 70 clinical hours equaling one semester credit for practicum/clinical. One hour per week, for 15 hours in a semester, equals one semester credit for didactic coursework. At the completion of the independent study, students meet with their faculty mentor for a final evaluation. The faculty mentor submits a grade when the student is deemed to have satisfactorily completed the independent study objectives. Independent studies may not extend beyond the semester of enrollment.

Course Waiver

If a student takes a course an institution other than George Washington University, he/she must apply for a waiver to substitute a course if the course is in a GW Nursing required plan of study. The number of credits is not transferred to GW Nursing and the student will need to make up the waived number of credits. A course waiver must be requested in writing and must include justification for the request from the student’s Program Director, who meets with the student to discuss how the waiver may affect their plan of study. The student must have earned a grade of “B” or better in the course to be eligible for a waiver. MSN and DNP students must provide the Program Director with a course description or syllabus of the previously-taken course, along with a transcript showing the grade the student received. The Program Director will make a recommendation regarding the waiver request. The student must then submit the course Program Director’s recommendation, waiver request, official transcript, and course description to the Assistant Dean of their program. The advisor, the student, and Program Director will be notified of the decision in writing. All students receiving course waivers will be required, with advisement, to take another course that will provide the appropriate number of credits to compensate for the waived course.

Relocation During Program of Study

Students planning to relocate to a state where GW Nursing does not operate, or operates on a restricted basis will not be able to complete their program of study as planned. Students should inform their Program Director and Program Associate of any planned relocation as soon as possible.

Advising

Each GW Nursing student will be assigned a faculty member as an academic advisor. The relationship is established to assure that the student is progressing satisfactorily in the program. Students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, or certificate programs must meet with their faculty advisor, in person or electronically, in order to review a program of study, listing all coursework required for the degree or certificate, including applicable transfer credit. Changes to the program of study can be made through petition to the Program Director. Faculty will provide office hours and opportunities for advising by appointment. Should any other non-academic concerns (i.e. personal bereavement or medical issues) arise which hinders a student’s academic success in their degree program, the student should first discuss the issue with their assigned faculty advisor. The faculty advisor may refer the student to the Program Director or to one of the university services for consultation.

Change of Specialty

A change of specialty request is treated like a new application for admission. The student must complete the same application process and meet the same deadlines as other prospective students. Requests are considered during the normal admission cycle and occur only during the specialties’ regular admission term. Students already enrolled at GW Nursing do not receive preferential treatment in the selection process; their applications are considered along with all other applicants. The student's current advisor must complete a Change of Specialty recommendation form to be included with the student’s application. The student remains in the original specialty with the assigned advisor until he/she is officially accepted into the new specialty Students may not request a change of specialty into a DNP program. The DNP is a separate degree program and not a change of specialty. MSN students must apply and receive an offer of admission for the DNP program if they want the DNP degree.

Changes in Course Enrollment

A student may not substitute one course for another without approval of the Program Director and the Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program. After the deadlines for adding or dropping courses, a student must obtain the permission of the course instructor, the Program Director, and the Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program to withdraw from a course. Students are subject to all GW financial regulations with respect to change in course enrollment as outlined in the GW Bulletin.

Honor Society

The GW Nursing Phi Epsilon chapter is a chartered member of Sigma Theta Tau International, the national honor society of nursing. GW Nursing students who meet the qualifications specified by the constitution of Sigma Theta Tau are eligible for membership and may be nominated by an Assistant/Associate Dean for the Program, faculty member, or a Sigma Theta Tau member.

Clinical and Practicum Policies

Licensure

Graduate students must hold an active, unencumbered RN license in the state where they are completing their clinical rotation. This may require students to obtain additional RN license during their GW Nursing program. Students are responsible for understanding the terms and limitations of their RN license. Some states participate in the Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) which gives multistate rights to RNs residing in a member state. Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) information can be found at https://www.ncsbn.org/compacts.htm.

The GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team will not search the State Board of Nursing websites or NURSYS to obtain or verify a student’s license. Students are not permitted to complete clinical hours in the states where GW Nursing does not operate. Student’s must allow adequate time before a clinical rotation to obtain any additional RN licenses for a clinical rotation and are responsible for submitting documentation to the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team.

Students planning to complete clinical rotations outside of the U.S. must contact the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team to verify licensure requirements. Any clinical hours accrued in the absence of the appropriate licensure will not be counted toward the total number of hours required in the program of study.

Clinical Compliance Management

GW Nursing partners with a thorough background screening program called CastleBranch©. This service, in collaboration with the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team, facilitates drug testing services. This service provides GW Nursing with the ability to assure safe student clinicians and keeps our clinical programs in compliance with the necessary regulations, accreditations, and standards. Documentation of the following is required prior to starting clinical rotations:

  • Criminal Background Check
  • Urine Drug Test
  • Proof of Current RN License if applicable  (in any and all states where you intend to complete clinical)
  • Proof of current CPR certification (AHA or ARC)
  • Proof of current personal health insurance (copy of health insurance card)
  • Physical Examination
  • Immunization Records: HepB, MMR, Varicella, TDaP, Seasonal flu, Meningococcal  
  • Annual TB Test (PPD, QFT or chest X-ray if positive PPD or allergic)
  • Verification of OSHA Training
  • Verification of HIPAA Training
  • Digital Photo

Students are not permitted to enter the clinical setting until all required items have been submitted to CastleBranch©. Entering the clinical setting prior to completing CastleBranch© requirements may be dismissed from their program of study. Any clinical hours accrued in the absence of required documentation will not be counted toward the total number of hours required in the program of study.

Clinical Site Specific Requirements

In addition to GW Nursing clinical requirements, clinical sites may have additional requirements. Students are responsible for meeting these requirements prior to starting the clinical rotation. Students are expected to notify the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team when all additional requirements have been met. Students are not permitted to start the clinical rotation until all site-specific requirements have been met and reported to the placement team. Any clinical hours accrued prior to meeting these requirements will not be counted toward the total number of hours required in the program of study.

Clinical Rotation Data Forms and Deadlines

All Nurse Practitioner (NP) students are expected to submit a Clinical Rotation Data Form indicating where and when they intend to start a clinical rotation, the clinical preceptor, and other site-specific information. A new data form should be submitted for each rotation, regardless if the student has been with the preceptor or at the clinical site previously. Rotation data forms must be submitted by the semester deadlines posted in the Blackboard Nurse Practitioner Community. Delay in form submission may result in delay in the clinical placement, or inability to place a student in time to meet course requirements.

Delay in Clinical Placement

Students who have not submitted a rotation data form 30 days in advance of the start of the semester will not be permitted to enroll in the clinical course. Students who have not met clinical requirements and/or have not been cleared for clinical placement due to failure to secure a clinical site by the mid-semester (week 5 of 10 week term; week 7 of 15 week term) are required to withdraw from the clinical course. A grade of “W” will be awarded and the student will be expected to repeat the course.

Notification of Clearance to Begin a Clinical Rotation

Once clinical requirements have been met and all required legal documents have been processed, students will be notified by the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team via email that they have been cleared to begin the clinical rotation. Clearance will be sent to the student’s GW email account.  Permission to begin clinical may only be granted by the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team. Students who enter the clinical setting prior to receiving clearance from the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team may be dismissed from their program of study. Any clinical hours accrued prior to receiving clearance from the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team will not be counted toward the total number of hours required in the program of study.

Required Components of a Clinical Placement                    

Prior to submitting a Rotation Data Form, students are expected to discuss their plans for completing clinical hours with their clinical advisor. Students who have not yet been assigned a clinical advisor (those preparing to enter their first clinical course) should review the clinical requirements that can be found in the Blackboard GW Nursing Nurse Practitioner Community. All Rotation Data Forms are reviewed by faculty prior to initiation of the placement process to ensure appropriateness of the site. Clinical clearance includes the following:

  • Faculty approval of site and preceptor
  • A fully executed clinical affiliation agreement between GW Nursing and the clinical site
  • Receipt of preceptor information
  • An active, unencumbered RN license for the student in the state of the clinical site
  • All GW Nursing preclinical requirements have been completed and uploaded in CastleBranch©
  • All state regulatory requirements
  • All site-specific requirements

Clinical Site Withdrawal

All Nurse Practitioner (NP) students are expected to submit a Clinical Rotation Data Form indicating where and when they intend to start a clinical rotation, the clinical preceptor data, and other site-specific information. Once a student submits a Clinical Rotation Data Form to the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team, it is the student’s responsibility to notify the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team if they no longer intend to complete clinical hours at that clinical site. In order to do so students must complete the Clinical Site Withdrawal Form. Completion of this form informs the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team that they should no longer devote resources to securing the clinical placement. GW Nursing works to enhance relationships with clinical site administrators and preceptors. Students are therefore required to notify the clinical site directly if they no longer intend to complete clinical hours at that site. If the clinical site notifies GW Nursing that the site can no longer accept the student, a member of the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team will contact the student directly.

Change of Preceptor

All GW Nursing graduate students must work with a licensed preceptor at an approved clinical site. The GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team reviews and verifies the credentials of all preceptors. When a student is notified of a change in preceptor by a clinical site, they are required to complete the Preceptor Change Form.  This form is required to:

  • Change preceptor

This form should be used when the submitted preceptor can no longer precept a student and has been replaced by another preceptor at the same site.

  • Add another preceptor

This form should be used when a student will have more than one preceptor at the same site.

  • Remove preceptor

This form should be used when the submitted preceptor can no longer precept a student and another preceptor has not yet been assigned.

This Preceptor Change Form is to be used only after a Clinical Rotation Data Form has been submitted for a clinical placement. Students must complete this form for any and all preceptor changes. Students may not begin working with a new preceptor until the form is reviewed and verified by the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team. Preceptors are also required to submit information to the school. It is imperative that students notify the GW Nursing Clinical Placement Team of all preceptor changes to ensure timely and accurate clinical placement.

In addition to degree programs in which a certificate is awarded along with the degree, the School of Nursing offers post-master’s certificate-only programs* in the following specialties:

The School of Nursing also offers post-baccalaureate certificate-only programs* in the following specialties:

Visit the School of Nursing Office of Admission website for additional information.

*As used in this section, “certificate program” refers to an established program in which just the certificate is awarded upon completion, rather than a degree program in which both a degree and a certificate are awarded at completion.

Explanation of Course Numbers

  • Courses in the 1000s are primarily introductory undergraduate courses
  • Those in the 2000–4000s are upper-division undergraduate courses that can also be taken for graduate credit with permission and additional work
  • Those in the 6000s and 8000s are for master’s, doctoral, and professional-level students
  • The 6000s are open to advanced undergraduate students with approval of the instructor and the dean or advising office

NURS 3101. Ethical Foundations of Nursing. 3 Credits.

Theories and principles related to common ethical and moral dilemmas faced by nursing professionals in their clinical practice. Methods of analyzing and resolving moral dilemmas using clinical decision making frameworks; methods for increasing awareness by examining and understanding the impact of the nurse’s own value system.

NURS 3102. Nutrition for Health Professionals. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of human nutrition and their scientific foundations. Nutritional requirements related to changing individual and family needs; food choices, health behaviors, food safety, prevention of chronic disease, and nutrition-related public health in the United States and globally.

NURS 3103. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Credits.

Designed for students entering the allied health professions. Fundamental structures and functions as they relate to the human body, including homeostasis, anatomical language and body organization, tissues and histology, integumentary; and skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. Requires a basic background in introductory cell/molecular biology; an equivalent course with a minimum grade of C may be substituted for the prerequisite. Prerequisites: BISC 1115 and 1125.

NURS 3104. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Credits.

Continuation of NURS 3103. Fundamental structures and functions as they relate to the human body, including homeostasis, anatomical language and body organization, tissues and histology; and cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Requires a basic background in introductory cell/molecular biology. Prerequisite: NURS 3103.

NURS 3110. Transition into the Nursing Profession. 2 Credits.

Historical and evolutionary perspectives in nursing in the context of current issues and trends in health care delivery and professional nursing. Values and characteristics of professional nursing practice by examining legal, regulatory, ethical issues, critical reasoning, evidence-based practice, and nursing self-care. Same as NURS 3110W.

NURS 3110W. Transition: Nursing Profession. 2 Credits.

Historical and evolutionary perspectives in nursing considered in the context of current issues and trends in health care delivery and professional nursing. The values and characteristics of professional nursing practice are examined in terms of legal, regulatory, and ethical issues as well as critical reasoning, evidence-based practice, and nursing self-care.

NURS 3111. Foundations of Health Assessment. 3 Credits.

Development of the knowledge and skills necessary for conducting comprehensive and need-specific health assessments for individuals in the context of their family and community; determining areas in which health promotion activities should be implemented or reinforced. Students use structured interviews to elicit health histories and health practices and perform physical examinations in a systematic manner. Identification of a broad range of normal variations through practice with peers in the laboratory setting. Nursing practice in the laboratory setting, including physical mobility, safety, infection control, drug calculation, medication administration, and other health technologies.

NURS 3112. Nursing Practice and Clinical Reasoning 1: Adult and Aging Acute and Chronic Illness. 3 Credits.

The values, knowledge and competencies at the foundation of safe, evidence-based, professional holistic nursing care of adults with common medical and surgical needs; essentials of the nursing process and disease process; expected outcomes and effects of nursing interventions with adults experiencing selected health conditions at multiple levels of care.

NURS 3113. Clinical Skills Lab: Adult Medical-Surgical 1. 6 Credits.

Foundational values, knowledge, skills, and competencies for safe, evidence-based, professional, and holistic nursing care of adults with common medical and surgical needs, and using critical thinking and effective communication skills to deliver such care in clinical and laboratory environments.

NURS 3114. Nursing Practice and Clinical Reasoning 2: Advanced Adult Medical-Surgical. 3 Credits.

Builds upon the basic concepts introduced in NURS 3112 by introducing complex, multi-system disease processes requiring a higher level of critical thinking. Safe, evidence-based, professional, and holistic nursing care related to the management of clients with advanced medical and surgical needs; knowledge, skills, and competencies for assessing and managing clients/patients in a hospital environment. Prerequisites: NURS 3110, NURS 3111, NURS 3112, NURS 3113 and NURS 3118.

NURS 3115. Clinical Skills Lab: Adult Medical-Surgical 2. 4 Credits.

Builds upon the basic concepts introduced in NURS 3113 by introducing complex, multi-system disease processes requiring a higher level of critical thinking. Safe, evidence-based, professional, and holistic nursing care related to the management of clients with advanced medical and surgical needs; knowledge, skills, and competencies for assessing and managing clients/patients in a hospital environment. Prerequisites: NURS 3110, NURS 3111, NURS 3112, NURS 3113 and NURS 3118.

NURS 3116. Nursing Practice and Clinical Reasoning 3: Psychiatric Mental Health. 3 Credits.

Theoretical principles, concepts, and skills applicable to the provision of safe and effective nursing interventions to clients across the lifespan who are experiencing psychiatric and mental health conditions. Application of scientific principles; assessing, planning, and evaluating nursing interventions; developing therapeutic communication, critical reasoning, analytical skills. Practical learning for promoting wellness of clients in acute and/or community-based psychiatric health care settings. Prerequisites: NURS 3110, NURS 3111, NURS 3112, NURS 3113 and NURS 3118.

NURS 3117. NCPR: 4 Maternity/Women Hlth. 3 Credits.

NURS 3118. Pharmacology I. 2 Credits.

The underlying principles of pharmacology and medication administration. Corequisites: NURS 3110 or NURS 3110W; and NURS 3111, NURS 3112, and NURS 3119.

NURS 3119. Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

Pathophysiology of common disease conditions affecting human beings across the lifespan; regulatory and compensatory mechanisms related to commonly occurring diseases; pathophysiologic bases of common human health alterations, associated clinical manifestations, and diagnostic assessments for each disease process.

NURS 4099. Variable Topics. 1-6 Credits.

Assigned topics determined by the School of Nursing. Restricted to students with prior permission of the undergraduate division of the School of Nursing.

NURS 4109. Introduction to Perioperative Nursing. 3 Credits.

The role of and fundamental knowledge, skills and competencies needed by the perioperative nurse. Based on the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses (AORN) fundamentals of perioperative practice, essential skills of teamwork, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking to deliver safe, evidence-based care. Method of instruction includes online modules, practical simulation activities, and clinical experiences. ABSN students who wish to perform their senior practicum in the operating room must take this course as a prerequisite to NURS 4120.

NURS 4116. NPCR 5: Children & Families. 3 Credits.

NURS 4117. NPCR 6:Epidemiology&CommHealth. 3 Credits.

NURS 4118. Pharmacology II. 1 Credit.

Principles of pharmacology and mechanisms of action of drug prototypes used in clinical practice. Prerequisites: NURS 3110, NURS 3111, NURS 3112, NURS 3118 and NURS 3119.

NURS 4119. PatientSafety&HlthCareQuality. 3 Credits.

NURS 4120. Capstone:Transition to Practice. 6 Credits.

Preparation for the transition from nursing student to graduate nurse. Students critically analyze, synthesize, and apply knowledge, skills, theories, and concepts learned in the program in a precepted clinical area of special interest. Focuses in part on preparation for the National Council Licensure Examination–RN (NCLEX–RN) with emphasis on test-taking strategies, problem solving, critical thinking, and computer assisted instruction; comprehensive assessment/readiness test and secure predictor tests for the NCLEX-RN are administered at the end of the program. Prerequisites: NURS 3110, NURS 3111, NURS 3113, NURS 3114, NURS 3115, NURS 3116, NURS 3117, NURS 3118, NURS 4116, NURS 4119, NURS 6201, NURS 6203 and NURS 6204.

NURS 4121. Nursing Advancement Portfolio. 0-15 Credits.

Upon admission to one of the Associate’s Degree in Nursing Pathway to Bachelor of Science in Nursing/Master of Science in Nursing programs, a student’s professional portfolio is evaluated and between 0-15 credits are awarded as part of the total credits required for the bachelor’s degree. If fewer than 15 credits are awarded, completion of one or more of the following courses may be required, as determined by the ​program ​director: NURS 3112, NURS 3113, and NURS 3118​. In lieu of tuition, a $500 portfolio evaluation fee is charged for this course.

NURS 4417. Community and Public Health Nursing. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the roles and responsibilities of nurses in community and population-based health. Concepts of community, public health, and health policy affecting culturally diverse and vulnerable populations; epidemiologic, demographic, economic, and environmental health factors used to identify community health needs; intervention strategies aimed at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Restricted to students in the RN to BSN program.

NURS 4418. Pharmacology 2. 1 Credit.

NURS 6180. Dimensions of Prof. Nursing. 3 Credits.

NURS 6202. Concepts in Population Health. 3 Credits.

Graduate-level nurses integrate and synthesize concepts associated with quality, health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic health problems with communities, the general population, and specific population groups. Issues related to culturally diverse and vulnerable populations.

NURS 6203. Nursing Leadership. 3 Credits.

Evidence-based leadership skills as a core competency in nursing to improve quality in patient care and strengthen nursing as a profession. Emphasis on theories of leadership, personal leadership, skill building, team-building techniques, change, conflict resolution, motivation, and communication skills.

NURS 6204. Health Information and Technology. 3 Credits.

Key issues and concepts related to the use of technology and information management to support the provision of high quality health care and outcomes.

NURS 6205. HealthPolicy,Quality,Political. 3 Credits.

The health policy process and analysis relevant to the three main thrusts of policy: cost, quality and access. Political, social, economic, and population factors that influence this process. Comparisons to health systems in other countries as appropriate. Quality science and informatics in the context of interdisciplinary, coordinated, and ethical health care delivery.

NURS 6207. Evidence-Based Practice for Health Care Researchers. 3 Credits.

The methodological issues of health care research. Appraisal and synthesis of research results and evidence-based methods. Identification and use of appropriate inquiry methodologies; ethical implications of research and translational scholarship.

NURS 6208. Biostatistics for Health Care Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the basic ideas and modeling approaches used in biostatistics through the use of health care research data. Descriptive and inferential statistics; identification of appropriate statistical procedures and estimation of appropriate sample size. Application of univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical procedures.

NURS 6209. Transitional Care. 3 Credits.

Transitional care planning and implementation, including pertinent health care policy, transitional care models, inter-professional collaboration, quality outcomes, multifaceted interventions, and the patient engagement dynamics that influence patient-centered care transitions in the current health care environment. Recommended background: BSN.

NURS 6210. Building a Quality Culture. 3 Credits.

NURS 6211. Health Care Quality Landscape. 3 Credits.

NURS 6212. Quality Improvement Science. 3 Credits.

NURS 6213. Health Care Quality Analysis. 3 Credits.

NURS 6214. Patient Safety Systems. 3 Credits.

NURS 6220. Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

System-focused advanced physiology and pathophysiology for analysis of health deviations across the life span. Interpretation of changes in normal function that result in symptoms indicative of illness. This systematic assessment is foundational to clinical decision making and management of health deviations.

NURS 6222. Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning. 4 Credits.

Nurse Practitioner and nurse-midwifery students will acquire the knowledge, skills and clinical foundation for advanced health assessment and diagnostic reasoning in the ambulatory health care setting. This course is a prerequisite to all other clinical courses and includes a fifteen-week online didactic course, a 75-hour clinical practicum and a three day, on-campus skills training session.

NURS 6224. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner 1, Practice Introduction. 4 Credits.

Theoretical and practical foundations of common primary care conditions in the adult patient. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of culturally diverse adults. Advanced decision making and clinical judgment, evidence-based practice, health promotion and disease prevention. Concurrent clinical practicum in a primary care setting under the supervision of preceptors and faculty. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234.

NURS 6225. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner 2, Adolescent & Adult. 8 Credits.

Theoretical and practical foundations of primary care of culturally diverse adolescents, adults, and older adults with chronic health problems. Synthesis and integration of advanced decision-making skills, including diagnostic reasoning and clinical judgment, health assessment, health promotion, technology, and evidence-based practice. Concurrent clinical practicum in which students manage patients in a primary care setting under the supervision of preceptors and faculty. A two- to three-day on-campus session is required. Prerequisites: NURS 6224.

NURS 6226. Primary Care of the Family. 5 Credits.

The theoretical and practical foundations of family primary care.

NURS 6227. Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum. 1-7 Credits.

Clinical course for family nurse practitioner students nationally certified in another APRN population; common acute and chronic problems across the lifespan; advanced clinical decision making, health assessment, health promotion, anticipatory guidance, diagnosis and management of common illnesses, and assessment of families from culturally diverse backgrounds. Current enrollment in or successful completion of a graduate clinical course or the permission of the Program Director is required for registration.

NURS 6228. Advanced Family Primary Care. 5 Credits.

Seminar and clinical practicum focusing on the integration of the family nurse practitioner role through the application of family theory and evidenced-based practice in primary care settings.

NURS 6229. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner 3, Adult, Older/Frail. 8 Credits.

Theoretical and evidence-based practice foundations for assessment and management of patients across the aging continuum. The physiologic, psychological, socioeconomic, emotional, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of the older adult in relationship to self, family, care-givers, and the health-care system are emphasized. Concurrent clinical practicum in which the student manages patients across the older-age spectrum under the supervision of preceptors and faculty. An on-campus visit is required in which students participate in a Standardized Patient final examination test-out. Prerequisites: NURS 6225.

NURS 6230. Family Nurse Practitioner 1, Lifespan Primary Care/Diagnosis/Management. 4 Credits.

First clinically based course for family nurse practitioner students. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care, focusing on prevention and common/chronic health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220 Advanced Pathophysiology, NURS 6222 Advanced Health Assessment, NURS 6234 Advanced Pharmacology.

NURS 6231. Family Nurse Practitioner 2, Lifespan Primary Care/Diagnosis/Management. 8 Credits.

Second clinically based course for family nurse practitioner students. Didactic and clinical experiences in family nurse practitioner care, focusing on prevention and common/chronic health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisites: N6220 Advanced Pathophysiology, N6222 Advanced Health Assessment, N6234 Advanced Pharmacology, N6230 FNP I.

NURS 6232. Family Nurse Practitioner 3, Professional Issues/Diagnosis/Management. 8 Credits.

Third course for family nurse practitioner students. Didactic and clinical experiences in primary care, focusing on prevention and common/chronic health problems across the lifespan. Consideration of professional issues for FNPs: Role development, certification, ethical issues in practice, inter-professional collaboration, and health care reimbursement issues are discussed and related to current clinical experiences. Prerequisites: NURS 6220 Advanced Pathophysiology, NURS 6222 Advanced Health Assessment, NURS 6234 Pharmacology, NURS 6230 FNP I, NURS 6231 FNP 2.

NURS 6233. Genetics for Healthcare Providers. 3 Credits.

Basic scientific principles of genetics and their clinical applications.

NURS 6234. Advanced Pharm for Nursing. 3 Credits.

This course will cover an introduction to pharmacotherapeutics as it primarily applied to Advanced practice Nurses in Primary Care settins. The course will briefly review key pathophysiologic points, and then will discuss the pharmocotherapeutic interventions that may be considered in the treatment of disease. The course will begin with a general introduction to the foundations for professional practice and the concepts of pharmacoeconomics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenetics will be introduced. Issues surrounding community practices in pharmacotherapeutics will be explored. The course will then focus on pharmacological interventions in the spectrum of disease states seen in primary care practices involving the Nervous system, Immune System, Cardiovascular system, Hematologic system, Genitourinary system, Gastrointestinal system, Respiratory system, Endocrine system, Sensory systems, and the Skin.

NURS 6235. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 1: Introduction to Practice. 4 Credits.

The second clinical practicum course for adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students. The scientific underpinnings and practical management of complex acute and chronic conditions across a spectrum of care delivery situations from subacute rehabilitation, to urgent care, emergency department, hospital-based care, and critical care; advanced decision making and clinical judgment in the application of evidence-based practice, health promotion, and disease prevention; acute and chronic conditions most commonly encountered across the spectrum of care delivery settings; theoretical, academic, and political elements involved in the evolution of the AGACNP role. In the required clinical practicum students manage patients’ acute, chronic, and critical conditions under the supervision of preceptors and faculty. Recommended background: prior completion of NURS 6220, NURS 6234 and NURS 6222.

NURS 6236. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 2: Complex and Acute Illness. 8 Credits.

The second clinical practicum course for adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students. Management of complex, acute stable and unstable conditions experienced by a variety of age groups from adolescents to middle-aged adults, to the elderly; application of advanced assessment techniques and technology for the diagnosis and management of patients. Both clinical and simulation experiences provide students with opportunities to provide advanced evidence-based interventions. Prerequisites: NURS 6235. Recommended background: prior completion of NURS 6220, NURS 6234 and NURS 6222.

NURS 6237. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 3: Complex and Chronic Disease Mgt Adolesc/Elderly. 8 Credits.

The third clinical practicum course for adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students. The scientific underpinnings and the practical management of complex acute and chronic conditions across a spectrum of care delivery situations from subacute rehabilitation, to urgent care, emergency department, hospital-based care, and critical care; the scope of practice of the AGACNP is not setting specific; rather, it is based on the needs of patients. Special issues for adolescents and the frail elderly and evaluation of care for adolescents, adults, and the elderly. Prerequisites: NURS 6235 and NURS 6236. Recommended background: prior completion of NURS 6220, NURS 6234 and NURS 6222.

NURS 6239. Bridge to Nurse Midwifery. 1 Credit.

NURS 6241. The Health Care Enterprise. 3 Credits.

Overview of general management business principles related to health care systems. Management of patient-centered care delivery; strategic health care leadership; organizational, marketing, and fiscal management principles. Same as HSCI 6241.

NURS 6242. Psychopharmacology. 3 Credits.

Essential theoretical foundations of neurobiology and psychopharmacology for nurse practitioners to provide safe behavioral health care across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6243. Addiction and Change. 3 Credits.

Principles of addiction and change with a focus on correlating how changes in behavior lead to recovery in addictions. Models of addiction and change, the neurobiology of addiction, behavior change theories and models, and treating addictions through behavioral mechanisms.

NURS 6244. Foundations for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. 3 Credits.

The nurse practitioner's role in providing behavioral health care in various health care systems across the lifespan; theoretical foundations for managing all phases of therapeutic relationships; psychosocial and risk assessment that meets clinical standards of care. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6245. Mental Health Diagnostic Assessment Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

Assessment framework for formulating accurate diagnoses of mental health disorders across the lifespan using criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders-5 (DSM-5). Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6246. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Clinical Practicum 1. 2 Credits.

Designed to build beginning level psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner skills with patients across the lifespan and in a variety of clinical settings. Students integrate knowledge from didactic and clinical course work to provide safe and competent behavioral healthcare. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222 and NURS 6234.

NURS 6247. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Clinical Practicum 2. 2 Credits.

Designed to build psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner skills in a variety of clinical settings. Students integrate foundational knowledge from course work to provide safe and competent behavioral healthcare to individuals across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234 and NURS 6246.

NURS 6248. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Clinical Practicum 3. 3 Credits.

Developing competency in the PMHNP role. Students integrate foundational knowledge from coursework to provide safe and competent behavioral healthcare to individuals across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234, NURS 6244, NURS 6245, NURS 6246 and NURS 6247.

NURS 6249. Psychotherapeutic Treatment Modalities. 3 Credits.

Evidence-based psychotherapeutic treatment modalities used by the nurse practitioner in providing behavioral health care across the lifespan. Theoretical foundations for selecting and using psychotherapeutic interventions as part of the treatment plan. Prerequisites: NURS 6220, NURS 6222, NURS 6234, NURS 6242, NURS 6243, NURS 6244, NURS 6245, NURS 6246 and NURS 6247.

NURS 6250. Family Nurse Practitioner I for Nurse Practitioners: Adult Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 2 Credits.

First theory course for family nurse practitioner students who are nationally certified in another APRN population. Focus is on prevention, screening, and the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health problems across the lifespan. Corequisite: NURS 6227. Prerequisite: NURS 6222.

NURS 6251. Family Nurse Practitioner II for Nurse Practitioners: Lifespan Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 4 Credits.

Second theory course for family nurse practitioner students nationally certified in another APRN population; prevention, screening, and the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health problems across the lifespan. Corequisite: NURS 6227. Prerequisite: NURS 6250.

NURS 6252. Family Nurse Practitioner III for Nurse Practitioners: Lifespan Primary Care Diagnosis Management. 4 Credits.

Third theory course for family nurse practitioner students nationally certified in another APRN population; common acute and chronic problems across the lifespan; professional issues, role development, certification, ethical issues in practice, inter-professional collaboration, and health care reimbursement issues. Corequisite: NURS 6227. Prerequisite: NURS 6251.

NURS 6256. Intro to Palliative Care. 3 Credits.

NURS 6258. Leadership Capstone Pract I. 3 Credits.

Nursing 6258 is the first of a two-semester capstone course designed to provide a mentored practicum that offers the opportunity to apply leadership content and refine leadership abilities in a setting and practice area mutually agreed upon by the student and course faculty.

NURS 6259. Leadership Capstone Pract II. 3 Credits.

Nursing 6259 is a continuation of NURS 6258 and is designed to provide a mentored internship practicum, the opportunity to apply leadership content, and refine leadership abilities.

NURS 6260. Foundations of Coaching. 3 Credits.

Nurse coaching methodology and competencies. Leadership and therapeutic relationship skills and the theory and meta-science fundamental to each skill. Assessing readiness for change, building trust and warmth, obtaining and holding the clients agenda, visioning, awareness raising techniques, brainstorming, and goal setting.

NURS 6261. Advanced Coaching Skills. 3 Credits.

Builds on concepts introduced in NURS 6260. Multidisciplinary and nursing theories foundational to nurse coaching. Advanced coaching techniques and common coaching topics and contexts such as weight loss, stress and time management, and executive coaching. Prerequisites: NURS 6260.

NURS 6262. Leadership Coaching in Nursing. 3 Credits.

Theoretical foundations and evidence for leadership coaching in nursing; the different applications of coaching in nursing management. Executive coaching, team coaching, peer coaching, and personal career coaching. Application and evaluation of multiple models, competencies, and methodologies for nursing leadership coaching through learning activities and live demonstration. Creation of a complete evidence-based coaching strategy for a case study.

NURS 6272. HumanResrcDev/HlthProfPractice. 3 Credits.

NURS 6273. Health Info Quality & Outcomes. 3 Credits.

NURS 6274. Health Economics & Finance. 3 Credits.

NURS 6275. Leadership &Change/Health Care. 3 Credits.

NURS 6276. Foundations of Palliative Care. 3 Credits.

NURS 6277. Pain and Suffering. 3 Credits.

NURS 6278. PalliativeCare:Chronic Illness. 3 Credits.

NURS 6279. Palliative Care Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Provides the advanced practice nurse with the opportunity to practice within an interdisciplinary healthcare team, integrating concepts from core courses to the holistic management of suffering, pain, and other symptoms.

NURS 6280. Palliative Care Practicum II. 1-4 Credits.

NURS 6281. PC Leadership and Management. 2 Credits.

NURS 6282. Teaching and Learning in Healthcare 1: Foundations of Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Principles of instructional design with an emphasis on the use of active, authentic learning and assessment methods in academic and healthcare delivery settings; analyzing learning needs, defining learning objectives, planning and sequencing strategies to support learner mastery, and assessing learning outcomes.

NURS 6283. Teaching and Learning in Healthcare 2: Learner Engagement. 3 Credits.

Theory- and evidence-based strategies and techniques to promote learner engagement, interactivity, and deep levels of learning; theories and principles of learner-centered teaching to facilitate learning in didactic and clinical settings.

NURS 6284. Teaching and Learning in Healthcare 3: Program and Curriculum Development. 3 Credits.

Design, development, implementation and evaluation of academic, clinical, and professional educational programs in nursing and other health professions; analysis and integration of national, professional and institutional policies, requirements, and standards to develop an outcomes-based curriculum.

NURS 6285. Overview of Health Care Policy. 3 Credits.

Federal, state, and local legislative, regulatory, electoral, and judicial structures and processes; applications to health care problem identification, policy decision making and implementation.

NURS 6286. Problem Analysis and Health Policy Formulation. 3 Credits.

Major health problems in the United States from within the framework of policy analysis; problem identification, agenda setting, policymaking, budgeting, implementation, and evaluation.

NURS 6287. Policy and Politics of Health Care Financing and Reimbursement. 3 Credits.

Perspectives on health care financing and reimbursement; the role of health professionals; direct and indirect influences of current health policies and reimbursement on cost, quality, access, and patient experience of care. Prerequisites: NURS 6285 and NURS 6286.

NURS 6288. Influencing Health Care Regulatory Policy. 3 Credits.

Analysis of rulemaking and regulatory processes that have an impact on health-related issues; workforce scopes of practice; public safety; and roles and influence of federal agencies and private organizations charged with implementing legislation. Prerequisites: NURS 6285 and NURS 6286.

NURS 6289. Influencing Health Care Legislative Policy. 3 Credits.

Constituent representation and fiduciary roles and responsibilities through participation on boards and committees; preparation of briefing materials, testimony, public comments regarding proposed rules. Prerequisites: NURS 6285, NURS 6286 and NURS 6287.

NURS 6290. Global Health for Health Care Professionals. 3 Credits.

Global health problems and issues from an interdisciplinary perspective; social determinants of health, health disparities, disease burden measurement and trends; possible policy solutions; and key ethical and human rights concerns.

NURS 6291. AdvTopics. 1-9 Credits.

NURS 6292. Teachw/Tech.inHealthProfession. 3 Credits.

NURS 6293. Health Ed.for Indiv&Community. 3 Credits.

NURS 6294. SpirtlBelief&Pract/HlthCare. 3 Credits.

NURS 6295. Health Care Quality Process. 3 Credits.

NURS 6296. Ped Health Assess & Pharm. 1 Credit.

NURS 6297. Independent Study. 1-9 Credits.

NURS 6298. NP Clinical Completion. 1-5 Credits.

NURS 8401. Org Concepts in Nursing. 3 Credits.

NURS 8402. Knowledge Managemnt in Nursing. 3 Credits.

NURS 8403. Translating Research into Prac. 3 Credits.

NURS 8404. Health Services Research and Policy for Nurses. 3 Credits.

The components, institutions, and characteristics of the U.S. health care system; using health services research to assess the impact of health policy on health system performance and nursing practice; formulation of policy-relevant research questions related to nursing; and the role of nurse leaders as change agents within the U.S. health policy environment.

NURS 8405. Healthcare Quality Improvement. 3 Credits.

NURS 8406. Field Exp Adv Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

NURS 8407. Grant Writing. 3 Credits.

NURS 8408. Topics Pharmacology. 3 Credits.

NURS 8409. Healthcare Quality Practicum. 3 Credits.

Application of quality improvement processes and patient safety theories, models, methods, and tools in health care settings to conceive and execute a quality improvement (QI) project in an organizational setting. The final deliverable is a comprehensive QI project report.

NURS 8410. Executive Presence I. 2 Credits.

NURS 8411. Executive Presence II. 2 Credits.

This is a continuation of Executive Presence I. In this course, the student will examine power shifts in leadership, revisit change as a stimulus for innovation, participate in an interactive session for individuals who can practice communicating their practicum proposals and receiving friendly feedback and constructive input from their peers, and re-evaluate the leadership development plan designed in Executive Presence I.

NURS 8412. HC Finance for Nurse Leaders. 3 Credits.

NURS 8413. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: Advanced Role Immersion. 3 Credits.

Students develop and integrate bedside with systems and population level competencies; role development, leadership, interdisciplinary collaboration, systems management, and evidenced-based practice are discussed and applied to concurrent clinical experiences; independent practice skills in the context of interdisciplinary teams. Prerequisites: NURS 6235, NURS 6236 and NURS 6237. Recommended background: prior enrollment in NURS 6220, NURS 6234 and NURS 6222.

NURS 8414. DNP Residency. 3 Credits.

NURS 8416. Entrepreneurship for Nurse Leaders. 3 Credits.

Concepts and methods of the entrepreneurial process for the nursing professional; the initial step of identifying and exploring an issue through pitching a final product.

NURS 8498. Research Project Proposal. 3 Credits.

NURS 8499. Clinical Research Project. 3 Credits.