Sociology (SOC)

Explanation of Course Numbers

  • Courses in the 1000s are primarily introductory undergraduate courses
  • Those in the 2000s to 4000s are upper-division undergraduate courses that can also be taken for graduate credit with permission and additional work
  • Those in the 6000s and 8000s are for master’s, doctoral, and professional-level students
  • The 6000s are open to advanced undergraduate students with approval of the instructor and the dean or advising office

SOC 1000. Dean's Seminar. 3 Credits.

The Dean’s Seminars provide Columbian College first-year students focused scholarship on specific intellectual challenges. Topics vary by semester. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more details. Restricted to First-year students in CCAS.

SOC 1001. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

A broad overview of the "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding social issues and personal experience; sociology’s place among the social sciences; basic elements of sociological perspectives. Credit will not be given for both SOC 1001 and SOC 1002. Same as SOC 1002.

SOC 1002. The Sociological Imagination. 3 Credits.

Definition and application of the concept of the sociological imagination; the connection between personal troubles and public issues; race, gender, inequality, and education. Credit will not be given for both SOC 1002 and SOC 1001. Same as SOC 1001.

SOC 1003. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the study of criminal justice. The historical development of criminal justice and its evolution into modern legal systems. The impact of different forms of criminal justice on society and the individual.

SOC 2000. Sophomore Colloquium. 3 Credits.

The Sophomore Colloquia are small seminar-style courses limited to second-year students in Columbian College. These courses engage students deeply in a discipline, focus on a narrow issue of high interest and impact, and require independent research projects of the students. Topics vary by semester. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more details. Restricted to Registration by instructor approval.

SOC 2101. Social Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Introduction to basic research methods in sociology. Topics include research design, sampling, measurement, and analysis of survey data via computer application. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2102. Techniques of Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Continuation of SOC 2101.Statistical analysis of sociological data with a strong emphasis on computer applications. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and PSC 2101 or PSYC 2101 or SOC 2101.

SOC 2103. Classical Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Analysis and critique of the development of Western European and North American social thought in the period of modernity. Consideration of the development of classical theoretical statements and the emergence of topics of sociological inquiry globally. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2103W. Classical Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Analysis and critique of the development of Western European and North American social thought in the period of modernity. Consideration of the development of classical theoretical statements and the emergence of topics of sociological inquiry globally. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2104. Contemporary Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

A systematic evaluation of the work of selected social theorists of the post–World War II era. Emphasis on application of theoretical concepts to matters of present-day concern. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2104W. Contemporary Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

A systematic evaluation of the work of selected social theorists of the post–World War II era. Emphasis on application of theoretical concepts to matters of present-day concern. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2105. Social Problems in American Society. 3 Credits.

Introduction to critical social problems (e.g., unemployment, poverty, crime, discrimination) in the United States and how they are, and have historically been, researched and understood by the academic and non-academic worlds. Concepts, theories, and methods of sociological research; examination of the field of social problems generally, emphasizing contemporary social problems. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2111. Field Research. 3 Credits.

Examination of the logic of qualitative inquiry and techniques of qualitative data collection and analysis. Various research methods are covered, with an emphasis on intensive interviewing, participant observation in field settings, and focus groups. Prerequisites: Either SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2112. Evaluation Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the evaluation of public programs designed to address the impact of social problems on individuals, households, and larger collective groups. Application of social science theory and research methods to the assessment of impact benefits and costs of such programs. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2135. Youth and Delinquency. 3 Credits.

Analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state’s formal systems of control. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2136. Criminology. 3 Credits.

Nature and distribution of crime as related to the development and operation of criminal law and various social and legal institutions. Analysis of the historical, social, legal, and cultural conditions affecting the nature of crime, criminality, and the development of state responses made to it. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 1003.

SOC 2137. Transnational Crime. 3 Credits.

Violation of laws across national boundaries in an environment of increased globalization; causation, victimization, and control. Examination of transnational crime as a social problem rooted in global inequality and disparate levels of development, not simply as a security or crime problem. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 1003.

SOC 2139. Alternatives to Imprisonment. 3 Credits.

Incarceration as a prominent feature of formal social control in the United States; the efficacy of strategies to reduce reliance on prisons; historical use of imprisonment and alternatives; the recent increase in correctional control and its social, cultural, and economic costs; the impact of incarceration on reducing crime; obstacles to reforming current incarceration policies; and the effectiveness of front-end and back-end strategies to reduce reliance on imprisonment. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 1003.

SOC 2145. Criminal Law. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the sources and fundamental principles of criminal law and procedure using major sociological perspectives as interpretive tools. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 1003.

SOC 2146. The Bill of Rights and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

Examination of the powers of law enforcement and how they relate to the rights conferred upon suspects and defendants by the U.S. Constitution.

SOC 2150. Sociology of Sports. 3 Credits.

Sport as a social institution; the role, consequences, and functions of sport in U.S. society; relationship between sport and institutions including education, mass media, economics, and politics.

SOC 2151. Jackie Robinson: Race, Sports, and the American Dream. 3 Credits.

How Jackie Robinson’s struggles and accomplishments can help in understanding current issues in race, sport, and U.S. society. The background leading to, and the impact emanating from, Robinson’s entry into major league baseball.

SOC 2152. Media, Class, Race, and Family. 3 Credits.

The reciprocal influences of mass media content and social structure, with particular attention to dominant media narratives. Methodologies for identifying and deconstructing media messages, marketing strategies, and entertainment themes, and how these align or conflict with social circumstances. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2161. Sociology of Complex Organizations. 3 Credits.

Review of sociological approaches to the study of complex organizations. Selected and comparative emphasis on bureaucratic organization in both government and private sectors. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2162. Sociology of the Family. 3 Credits.

An examination of the stages of family life: birth, childhood, premarital relationships, marriage and sex roles in marriage, retirement and old age. Special emphasis on development and maintenance of interpersonal relations. Prerequisites: COMM 1025 or SOC 1001 or SOC 1002 . Same as COMM 2162.

SOC 2163. Sociology of Education. 3 Credits.

Analysis of educational systems from historical–comparative, institutional, and micro-sociological perspectives. Emphasis on educational systems in relation to the religious, cultural, economic, and political forces shaping their character; the role of formal education in modern society. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2164. Sociology of the Holocaust and Genocide. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of genocide from historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives. The centrality of ideologies of power and race to acts of genocide. Genocides of the past century will be examined to deepen students' understanding of the crime and its aftermath. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2165. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the relationships between religion and society. Topics include the contribution of religion to social integration, social change, and social inequality; the nature of religious experience; religious symbolism; the basis of religious communities. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2167. Sociology of Law. 3 Credits.

Law as a social phenomenon and agency of social control; study of judicial process and the sources of and challenges to the legitimacy of law. Prerequisites: SOC 1003; and SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2168. Economic Sociology. 3 Credits.

Sociological approach to the study of microeconomic and macroeconomic behavior. Historical and comparative analyses informed by the literature of sociology and other social sciences. Critical review of economic policy in developing, post-communist, and advanced market societies. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2169. Urban Sociology. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the city from a sociological perspective. Topics include the social change and inequality associated with urban growth, neighborhood change, and suburbanization; residential segregation; the issue of whether community exists in cities; urban poverty and homelessness. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2170. Class and Inequality in American Society. 3 Credits.

Analysis of distribution of resources and opportunities for participation, education, and social mobility; international comparisons; analysis of public policies that affect these distributions. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002. Same as SOC 2170W.

SOC 2170W. Class/Inequality-Amer Society. 3 Credits.

Analysis of distribution of resources and opportunities for participation, education, and social mobility. International comparisons; analysis of public policies that affect these distributions. Prerequisite: Either SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2172. Institutional Racism: Policies and Prescriptions. 3 Credits.

Institutional policies and practices in the United States that yield racially disparate outcomes. The origins of such policies and practices, potential changes, and how such changes can be achieved. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2173. Social Movements. 3 Credits.

General survey of the various forms of collective behavior (fads, panics, riots, social movements, etc.), and a more detailed study of the genesis, development, and decay of social movements and social revolutions. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2175. Sociology of Sex and Gender. 3 Credits.

The consideration of gender and sex as organizing principles of social relations. Analysis of the dynamics of inequality in such areas as families, the workforce, culture and mass media, politics, sexual relationships, law medicine, religion, and education. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2177. Sociology of the Sex Industry. 3 Credits.

Sociological examination of sex workers and businesses in the United States and other nations. Analysis of major theoretical perspectives and research on the social organization of sex work, the experiences of participants, issues of gender and sexuality, and alternative policy frameworks regarding prostitution, pornography, and commercial stripping. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 2175 or SOC 2178.

SOC 2178. Deviance and Control. 3 Credits.

Examination of deviant behavior and its control. Topics include theoretical perspectives, changing societal conceptions of deviance, deviant behavior and identity, and the dynamics of control agencies. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2179. Race and Minority Relations. 3 Credits.

Analysis of relationships between dominant and minority groups in society; nature and range of problems; analysis of the phenomenon of prejudice. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2181. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit provided topic differs. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more details. Prerequisite: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2181W. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

Analysis and examination of various processes in society of general importance to the field of sociology, e.g., social conflict, socialization, social change. Topic changes each semester; may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Either SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2184. Violence and the Family. 3 Credits.

Comparative approach to power and violence in family systems. Analysis of devaluation of family relations. Critical survey of explanations of violence and responses made to it. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2189. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 4 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit provided topic differs. Consult the Schedule of classes for more details. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; SOC 1003.

SOC 2189W. Special Topic-Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

Analysis and examination of various processes and problems of general importance to the field of criminal justice. Topic changes each semester; may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Either SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 2988. Internship in Law and Society. 3 Credits.

Study of the American legal system and its effects on individuals and society through practical experience. Students must have a confirmed and approved internship involving substantive work within the legal system. The internship should be appropriate for an undergraduate student and require a minimum work commitment of 15 hours per week. SOC 2167 and UW 2031/2031W may be taken concurrently. Restricted to students in the minor in law and society program. Prerequisites: SOC 2167; and UW 2031 or UW 2031W.

SOC 3195. Research. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study and special projects. Open only to selected undergraduates with promising academic records. Students must submit a written proposal of their plan of study for the approval of the member of the department who will direct the research. Departmental approval required for registration. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002.

SOC 4192. Advanced Seminar in Criminal Justice. 6 Credits.

Internship in a criminal justice agency; field placement in consultation with a faculty member is required before registration. Weekly seminar meetings, presentations, journal, and a paper are required. Restricted to seniors majoring in criminal justice. Prerequisites: SOC 1001 or SOC 1002; and SOC 1003; and SOC 2136 or SOC 2145.

SOC 4195. Senior Research Seminar. 3 Credits.

For sociology majors. Directed research and writing on sociological topics. Topics vary by semester. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more details. Restricted to Sociology majors only. Prerequisites: SOC 2101 or SOC 2102 and SOC 2103 or SOC 2104.

SOC 6230. Sociological Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Survey of the procedures, methods, and problems of contemporary sociological data collection, with an emphasis on survey methods. Major topics include research design, instrument construction, survey sampling, and measurement.

SOC 6231. Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Intensive study of quantitative data analysis techniques, with strong emphasis on computer applications. Prerequisite: SOC 6230.

SOC 6232. Qualitative Methodology: Doing Field Research. 3 Credits.

Practical application of data collection methods in natural settings; observation, participant observation, and field experience. Emphasis on implementing research projects by using these methods for purposes of developing empirically grounded theory.

SOC 6238. Development of Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Development of sociology from the early 1800s to the 1920s. Intensive analysis of the classical theoretical statements.

SOC 6239. Contemporary Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Intensive examination and evaluation of contemporary schools of sociological theory in Europe and America. Advanced analysis of theoretical perspectives.

SOC 6240. Field Research in Organizational Settings. 3 Credits.

Applications of field research techniques in formal organizational settings. Examination of the logic of qualitative inquiry and techniques of qualitative data collection. Intensive interviewing and participant observation in field settings are emphasized.

SOC 6244. Sociology of Families and Kinship. 3 Credits.

A systematic introduction to recent theoretical perspectives and empirical research on family patterns. The course combines a focus on how and why societal family patterns vary and change over time with an examination of how individuals vary in their experience of life course transitions, such as marriage, childbirth, employment, divorce, and retirement.

SOC 6245. Race Relations. 3 Credits.

Systematic analysis of race relations and inequality, primarily in the United States. Topics include current status and recent trends in inequality, the institutional and organizational patterning of discrimination, the structure of racial attitudes, theoretical perspectives on race relations, and selected policy issues.

SOC 6246. Comparative Race and Ethnicity. 3 Credits.

Examination of race and ethnic relations in comparative, international perspective. Selected societies are analyzed in terms of patterns of racial and ethnic inequality, intergroup relations, institutional foundations of discrimination, social control systems, and sources of social change.

SOC 6248. Race and Urban Redevelopment. 3 Credits.

An examination of sociological forces shaping the development of metropolitan areas, racial inequality, and the intersections of urban development and race relations. Major theories of urban and metropolitan development and causes of racial inequality; major past and current public policies.

SOC 6250. Urban Sociology. 3 Credits.

Systematic analysis of urbanization and life within urban areas, primarily in the United States. Topics include theoretical perspectives on urban growth and neighborhood change, housing, the community question, neighborhood effects on individuals within the metropolis, and selected policy issues.

SOC 6252. Selected Topics. 3 Credits.

Examination of selected topics of general importance to sociology. May be repeated once for credit.

SOC 6254. Evaluation Research. 3 Credits.

Systematic survey of the conceptualization, design, and practice of evaluation research. Prerequisite: SOC 6230.

SOC 6255. Practicum in Applied Sociology. 3,6 Credits.

Supervised sociological research through an internship in a local organization (e.g., a government agency, a non-governmental organization, or a research firm). The internship must be for at least 10 hours a week. Weekly seminar; final paper. Prerequisite: completion of all methodology requirements for the M.A. degree.

SOC 6257. Criminal Law for Forensic Scientists. 3 Credits.

An overview of criminal law offenses and procedures, evidence recovery, admissibility of scientific evidence, and expert testimony. Emphasis on the interaction between the criminal process and forensic science. Instruction includes a moot court exercise. (Same as FORS 6224).

SOC 6258. Deviance and Control. 3 Credits.

Examination of major theories and research in the field of deviance and social control, with special emphasis on recent empirical advances and comparative perspectives.

SOC 6259. Criminology. 3 Credits.

The status of various criminology theories. Theories of crime causation and crime control; cross-cultural research on crime.

SOC 6260. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

Examination of selected topics in criminal justice. May be repeated once for credit if the topic differs.

SOC 6261. Sociology of Law. 3 Credits.

The development and use of law in complex societies, including the different roles of civil and criminal law. The role of the sociology of law within the discipline of sociology.

SOC 6262. Corrections. 3 Credits.

Analysis of adult and juvenile correctional systems, including probation, parole, jails, and prisons. Topics include theoretical perspectives, the impact of corrections on crime rates, and evaluations of sentencing and other reforms.

SOC 6263. Race and Crime. 3 Credits.

Examination of race, crime, and punishment in American society. Analysis of competing theoretical explanations for interracial differences in crime rates, and racial patterns in the apprehension, adjudication, and punishment of offenders.

SOC 6264. Organized Crime. 3 Credits.

The role of organized crime in the political economy of different countries, with emphasis on the development of organized crime networks in the United States.

SOC 6265. Women, Welfare, and Poverty. 3 Credits.

How the causes and consequences of poverty differ for women and men; how race, class, and gender shape policy responses to poverty. The history of family assistance policy in the United States and the impact of various welfare reform efforts. (Same as WGSS 6265).

SOC 6266. Gender and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

How understandings, practices, and theories of gender shape the workings of criminal justice systems, including issues of criminality and responses to crime, victimization and violence, and definitions of illegal behaviors. (Same as WGSS 6266).

SOC 6268. Race, Gender, and Class. 3 Credits.

How social structures are constructed through race, gender, and class and how they shape experience; the intersections of race, gender, and class in education, science, politics, labor markets, and social welfare policies. (Same as WGSS 6268).

SOC 6271. Gender and Society. 3 Credits.

Current empirical and theoretical work on gender as an organizing principle of social relations; the relationship of gender to sex and sexuality.

SOC 6272. Theoretical Perspective-Gender. 3 Credits.

SOC 6273. The Sex Industry. 3 Credits.

Sociological examination of prostitution, pornography, and other forms of sex work in the United States and internationally. Topics include theoretical perspectives, structure of the sex industry, workers’ experiences, gender issues, political conflicts, and policy implications.

SOC 6286. The Law of Race and Slavery. 3 Credits.

The role of legal norms and processes in developing patterns of slavery and race relations in the United States and other societies. Permission of the instructor required prior to enrollment. Same as HIST 6312 and LAW 6596.

SOC 6290. Principles of Demography. 3 Credits.

Introduction to basic demographic perspectives and data; methods for analysis of population size, distribution, and composition; determinants and consequences of population trends. Departmental prerequisite waived. Same as ECON 6290/ GEOG 6290/ STAT 6290.

SOC 6291. Methods of Demographic Analysis. 3 Credits.

Basic methods for analysis of mortality, natality, and migration; population estimates and projections; estimation of demographic measures from incomplete data. Departmental prerequisite waived. Same as ECON 6291/ GEOG 6291/ STAT 6291.

SOC 6295. Research. 1-12 Credits.

Independent study and special projects. Before permission is granted to register for SOC 6295, the student must submit a written plan of study for the approval of the staff member of the department who will be directing the research. May be repeated once for credit but to no more than a total of 6 credits.

SOC 6998. Thesis Research. 3 Credits.

SOC 6999. Thesis Research. 3 Credits.