Bachelor of Professional Studies with a Major in Police and Security Studies

The bachelor of professional studies with a major in police and security studies degree program helps students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to work more effectively as police professionals. Developed by faculty in consultation with metropolitan area law enforcement and police specialists, the core coursework is designed to develop three central areas of competency: intelligence and criminal analysis; forensic science; and leadership and management. Elective courses are offered in a variety of disciplines, including sociology, leadership, public health, and international affairs.

Visit the program website for admissions and additional program information.

The following requirements must be fulfilled: 120 credits, including 30 credits in general education courses, 60 credits in required courses, and 30 credits in elective courses. 

General Education*
6 credits of English composition or UW 1020 University Writing plus 2 credits of independent research with a focus on the application of the principles learned in UW 1020
6 credits of quantitative and logical reasoning
6 credits of social and behavioral sciences
6 credits of natural sciences
6 credits of arts and humanities
Required
Intelligence and Criminal Analysis
Particular Forms of Crime (Intelligence and Criminal Analysis)
Models of Policing
Criminal Intelligence
Criminal Analysis (Forensic Science )
Predictive Policing
Forensic Science
Introduction to Forensic Science
Crime Scene Investigation
Computer Crime Investigation
Incident Management
The Criminal Mind
Leadership and Management
Resource Management
Leading Teams
Strategic Planning
Ethical Dilemmas in Policing
Capstone Simulation

*General education and elective courses may be completed at any regionally accredited institution. A minimum grade of C is required for transfer credit to be approved. General education and elective coursework may be completed before, during, or within five years of completing the other requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Director J. Delinski