Corcoran Interior Design (CID)

CID 0850. Color in Interiors. 0 Credits.

Preparing a cohesive color palette in the home is a challenging task, particularly when rooms are renovated over a period of time. This seminar will provide the student with the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of color application, as well as the skills necessary to refine their design strategy as their design needs change.

CID 0860. In My Home. 0 Credits.

For the aspiring non-professional, this course focuses on the basic elements of interior design. A simplified approach to the principles of design in a residential interor allows continuing education students the opportunity to explore interior design within the context of their own homes. This course is offered for non-credit only, and is recommended for those whose interest in interior design is limited to the decoration of their own homes.

CID 1000. Introduction to Interior Design. 3 Credits.

This introductory course provides students with an overview of the elements that comprise the practice of interior design. Studio assignments promote theoretical and analytical problem-solving skills. Students will learn the rudiments of the use of materials and finishes, interior construction, drafting and rendering, space planning, and color theory. This course is recommended for students considering interior design as a profession. This course may be cross-tallied as ID5000 at the graduate level for MA in Interior Design program prerequisites. Additional work is required for graduate level credit.

CID 1200. Stand on the Right, Walk on the Left: Human Response to the Urban Environment. 3 Credits.

This course explores the dynamics of people and space, how they interact with each other, and how this informs the way we design. Students will be immersed in a collaborative, interactive studio experience which will involve: instructor-led or self-guided expeditions in and around the city during class time; observation, data-collection, and thoughtful documentation of findings; conceptual sketching; and model making. An increased curiosity and awareness of our surroundings and the way we interact with our environment will lead to an introductory exploration of human factors including; scale, anthropometrics, ergonomics, universal design, and cultural contexts. Students will also engage in the study of texts and films which explore the basic frameworks of design at its core, and will be asked to react to the readings/viewings. Students will use photography and social media tools such as Pinterest and Instagram to explore and document observations in their own environment using the rich, dynamic setting of Washington DC. The final product of this studio will be a photo-documentary, inspired buy Jane Fulton Suri's "Thoughtless Acts," which probes ideas and asks questions similar to those we will be exploring in the course.

CID 1210. Elements & Principles of Interior Design. 3 Credits.

This introductory interior design studio focuses on the fundamental elements and principles of interior design.The studio explores the elements and principles of design as tools to create, manipulate, and affect interior environments. Specifically, the course explores point, line, plane, form, shape, color, texture, light, proportion, scale, balance, harmony, unity and variety, rhythm andemphasis in relation to 3D space. Students translate the elements and principles to 2D visual presentation strategies through the creation of physical and digital design boards. The elements and principles of design are explored in relation to architectural drawing as communication, 2D visual presentation, and 3D spatial experience.

CID 1250. Drawing for Interior Design. 1.5 Credit.

Architecture and Interior Design professionals use drawings to communicate ideas and designs to their clients. This course will introduce students to the skills of hand drawing and sketching of architectural interiors. The basics of orthogonal projections such as plan, section, elevation, and simple perspectives will be taught in this course.

CID 2000. Introduction to Perspective and Interior Rendering. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to linear, two-, and three-point perspectives, and rendering of interior space (and elements within that space) in various media. Students will learn to observe, analyze, interpret, and reproduce what they see. Special attention will be paid to the expressive use of color, the interrelationships of forms, and the placement of the human figure in an interior space. It is recommended that students take this coures in a different semester than CID 2100, Color Theory for Interiors.

CID 2050. Representation/Documentation. 3 Credits.

Through a series of projects including drawing and model making, students will gain valuable skills in documenting visual culture, developing tools for representing design concepts. This studio course provides an in-depth study of the conventions of plan, section and elevation as they relate to visual experience. Problems expand the students' ability to translate between two-dimensional exercises and three-dimensional visual experience. This course is only offered during the Fall semester. This course may be cross-tallied as CID 5150 at the graduate level for MA in Interior Design program prerequisites.

CID 2090. Interior Design Studio I. 3 Credits.

In this course, students utilize the elements and principals of design and human factor considerations to explore the design of a compact space. Students learn an iterative design process to explore and develop concepts. The course provides continued emphasis on presentation, hand drafting, and translation of concepts to 3D spatial experiences. This course requires a high level of execution through precise craftsmanship.

CID 2091. Interior Design Studio II. 3 Credits.

In this course, students explore branding in relation to spatial environments. This approach to interior design focuses on the manipulation of space, the selection of furniture, finishes, and materials, and graphics development to create a unique experience and identity. The developed brand identity will be applied to the interior design, as well as presentation materials in a comprehensive and cohesive manor. This studio provides an introduction to commercial space planning, building codes, and ADA guidelines. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in CID 2090 Interior Design Studio II; or Department Chair's approval.

CID 2100. Color Theory for Interiors. 3 Credits.

CID 3050. Interior Design Digital Applications I. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the foundations of AutoCAD and basic drafting skills. Students learn the basics of computer-assisted drafting techniques, including basic drawing, dimensioning, layering, and various commands for drawing and document output. Prerequisite: CID 1000.

CID 3060. Revit I. 3 Credits.

Upon the completion of this course, students will be proficient in building information modeling (BIM). BIM creates coordinated, consistent, computable information that is used for design decision making, high-quality visual presentation production, construction documents, performance prediction, cost estimating, construction planning, and, eventually, for managing and operating a facility. Mirroring the real world of buildings and interiors, Revit Architecture helps students accurately capture their design concepts. The software will bridge students' visions from concept to reality through innovative design, accurate documentation, and efficient construction. Integrated bidirectional associativity helps ensure that any change to students' project information is reflected throughout the students' models, while parametric components offer an open, graphical system for conceptualizing and expressing detailed design intent. Course concepts will facilitate more precise conceptual design, which will enhance client understanding while supporting more efficient and sustainable production, construction, and fabrication. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the graduate level as CID 6060. Additional work is required to earn graduate credit. Prerequisite: CID 1000 Introduction to Interior Design.

CID 3090. Interior Design Studio III. 3 Credits.

This studio class pursues the aesthetic and technical principles of more complex and larger-scale residential and contract projects. Conceptual thinking, creative problem solving, and attaining project goals are stressed. Students work at a more advanced level in articulating and presenting design solutions. Drawing, model-making, and other presentation skills are stressed. Prerequisite: CDE 2091 Interior Design Sophomore Studio II.

CID 3091. Interior Design Studio IV. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the design issues implicit in commercial spaces, including office, hospitality, retail, medical and institutional. Students will become acquainted with the organizational, social, physical, psychological, and cultural factors integral to the design of such spaces. Students will focus on one of the building project types and prepare a comprehensive design solution for a professional critique. Prerequisite: CID 3090 Interior Design Studio III.

CID 3100. Interior Lighting Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the effects of light on interior space, as well as to various lighting products and lighting systems. Students will learn about the lighting challenges for interior spaces and how to effectively meet them. The course teaches the basics of lighting layout, lighting terminology, and the lighting designer's role in the interior design process. Within the studio structure, students are expected to produce a complete lighting package, including a fixture schedule and reflected ceiling plan. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the graduate level as CID 6100. Additional work required for graduate level credit is outlined in the course syllabus. Prerequisite: CIR 1000 or CID 1000 Introduction to Interior Design, or permission of Department Chair. The textbook, Interior Lighting for Designers by Gary Gordon and Jim Nuckolls (either third or fourth edition), will be necessary for the first class.

CID 3110. Materials, Methods, and Finishes. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the major materials available to designers and architects, including their structure, properties, potential expressive qualities, and their use. Students learn how to integrate materials into the design and construction of interior spaces. The course familiarizes students with the selection of appropriate materials for various uses based on function, aesthetics, safety, comfort, and maintenance. During the course of this class, students will gain an understanding of construction documents including both drawings and specifications. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the graduate level as CID 6110. Additional work required for graduate level credit is outlined in the course syllabus. This course is only offered during the Fall semester. Prerequisite: CID 1000 Introduction to Interior Design. It is also recommended that CID 3050 Autocad I or CID 6060 Revit I is completed prior to enrolling in this course.

CID 3900. Interior Design Internship. 3 Credits.

Internships can help students develop marketable skills, establish professional contacts, and explore different career options. A good internship should offerthe student career-related experience in a setting where the student may learnabout professional practice in their field. While some administrative tasks arenecessary, these should be minimal with most of the work focusing on skillbuildingor educational opportunities. Continuing Education students are noteligible to receive credit for internships.Students are responsible for locating and securing individual internships, withthe assistance and approval of their department chair. To receive credit foran internship, the student needs to complete an internship contract and theappropriate registration form. The internship contract is the agreement betweenthe internship provider, the Corcoran, and the student; all three must be signed.Undergraduate StudentsTo be eligible to earn academic credit for an internship, students must havecompleted their Foundation Year or have earned equivalent credits (30).While students are free to do multiple internships while enrolled at the Corcoran,students cannot take more than one internship per semester. A 45-60 hour internship is equivalent to 1.5 credits and a 90-120 hour internship isequivalent to 3 credits.The student must receive signed approval from his or her department chairbefore he or she will be allowed to register for internship credit. The departmentchair's signature must appear on both the contract and the registration form orthe internship registration will not be processed. The contract must be turned into the Office of Student Affairs before the internship start date. The registrationor add/drop form must be submitted to the Registrar's Office before the add/drop deadline of the semester the student is seeking credit. Late contracts willnot be accepted and credit will not be given.In order to receive a grade for the internship the student is required to submita mid-semester evaluation and final evaluation of the internship experience.The internship provider is required to submit a final evaluation of the student'sperformance with a recommendation for a grade (pass/fail) no later than 10working days prior to the end of the semester. The student's department chair is responsible for reviewing the student and employer evaluations andsubmitting the final grade to the Registrar's Office.

CID 4060. Advanced Revit. 3 Credits.

This class expands upon the fundamental skills learned in Revit I, allowing students to produce independent projects that reflect the full scope of tools and techniques available to Revit users. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the graduate level as CID 7060. Additional work is required to earn graduate credit. Prerequisite: CID 3060 Revit I.

CID 4090. Interior Design Thesis I. 3 Credits.

Interior Design Senior Thesis is comprised of three components: a written paper, interview of a design professional, and a final interior design thesis project. In this course, students select a topic related to the field of Interior Design, develop a thesis statement and written paper through a research and writing phase. Interior Design project concepts pertaining to the development of the written thesis and paper are explored during the semester. This course is for BFA/Interior Design only. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in CID 3091 Interior Design Studio IV; or Department Chair's approval.

CID 4091. Interior Design Thesis II. 3 Credits.

Interior Design Senior Thesis is comprised of three components: a written paper, interview of a design professional, and a final interior design thesis project. Students finalize the written thesis paper on a design-related topic. Then, students interview a prominent practitioner in the field of Interior Design. As the third component of Interior Design Senior Thesis, students translate their thesis paper into a interior design thesis project. Upon completion, the thesis projects are presented in a special museum exhibition. This course is for BFA/Interior Design only. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in CID 4090 Interior Design Senior Thesis I; or Department Chair's approval. Prerequisite: CID 4090 Interior Design Thesis I.

CID 4600. Selected Topics in Interior Design. 3 Credits.

Through a changing selection of design studios with instructors drawn from the professional design community, this studio will offer a broad range of topics from which students may choose during their course of study. The shifting nature of the subject matter of this studio intentionally allows for topical issues in the design community to be addressed. Topic varies each time it is offered.

CID 5000. Introduction to Interior Design. 3 Credits.

This introductory course provides students with an overview of the elements that comprise the practice of interior design. Studio assignments promote theoretical and analytical problem-solving skills. Students will learn the rudiments of the use of materials and finishes, interior construction, drafting and rendering, space planning, and color theory. This course is recommended for students considering interior design as a profession. This course may be cross-tallied as CID 1000 at the undergraduate level.

CID 5100. Color Theory for Interiors. 3 Credits.

The use of color and interaction of color and light are essential elements of interior design. Through in-depth study of color sequences and primary, secondary and tertiary relationships, students will explore the effects of color on design concept and application. Using various media including painting, textiles and finishes, students will explore issues of color interaction. Throughout this studio class, students will work toward developing their own unique aesthetic as artists and designers. It is recommended that students take this coures in a different semester than CID 2000, Introduction to Perspective and Interior Rendering.

CID 5110. Perspective and Interior Rendering. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to linear, two-, and three-point perspectives, and rendering of interior space (and elements within that space) in various media. Students will learn to observe, analyze, interpret, and reproduce what they see. Special attention will be paid to the expressive use of color, the interrelationships of forms, and the placement of the human figure in an interior space. It is recommended that students take this coures in a different semester than CID 2100, Color Theory for Interiors.

CID 5150. Representation/Documentation. 3 Credits.

Through a series of projects including drawing and model making, students will gain valuable skills in documenting visual culture, developing tools for representing design concepts. This studio course provides an in-depth study of the conventions of plan, section and elevation as they relate to visual experience. Problems expand the students' ability to translate between two-dimensional exercises and three-dimensional visual experience. This course is only offered during the Fall semester. This course may be cross-tallied at the undergraduate level as CID 2050.

CID 5200. Intro to Digital Presentation and Techniques. 3 Credits.

This class will explore the possibilities for creating, manipulating images, and transforming ideas using computer software. Students will learn basic tools and techniques along with the overall concepts of scanning and digitizing images, rendering elevations and perspectives and creating presentation boards and templates for the Interior Design and Exhibition Design profession. The course will introduce a variety of software from the Adobe Creative Suite. Students will experience enough knowledge to aid them in their future classes. Additional lab time is encouraged for class assignments and individual projects. CID 5000 Intro to Interior Design completion recommended prior to enrollment in this course but not required.

CID 6000. Interior Design Summer Studio. 3 Credits.

This course exposes the student to the studio environment for learning and exploring varioustopics related to design of the built environment. Through an intensive two-week series ofassignments, the student will be exposed to fundamental topics and skills requisite of theinterior design discipline. The program will model the ideals of studio culture, including regularpresentation, critique, and peer-review of ongoing and final work. The course will introducestudents to a design-thinking methodology with experiences in both analog and digital media inthe representation of interior design ideas.

CID 6010. Interior Design Studio I. 3 Credits.

Studio 1 introduces the fundamental conventions and principles of interior design, visual and verbal communication, formal analysis, and design process. Students will develop an awareness of spatial composition, perceptual sequence, basic program, and simple building systems related to the built environment.

CID 6020. Interior Design Studio II. 3 Credits.

Building on the foundation of CID Studio 1, this course will further student understanding of thefundamental conventions and principles of interior design. Emphasis will be placed on issues of specific program, site, or typology with a focus on understanding design standards and regulations. Through the completion of a series of projects, students will develop a deeper understanding of more complex spatial and anthropometric considerations. Additionally, students will be introduced to material and color systems.

CID 6050. Interior Design Digital Applications I. 3 Credits.

This course introduces digital applications as they relate to an interior design process. Students are introduced to the drawing methods of drafting and annotation in the examination of digital visualization as it relates to analysis and synthesis. Assignments concentrate on fundamental concepts of digital representation, including the creation of measured drawings, layer management, and various output formats.Formerly titled: AutoCAD II.

CID 6060. Interior Design Digital Applications II. 3 Credits.

Information modeling for an interior design process. Three-dimensional visualization, digital rendering, and the development of construction documents. Concept models, accurate documentation, and efficient construction. Prerequisites: CID 6050.

CID 6100. Interior Lighting Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the effects of light on interior space, as well as to various lighting products and lighting systems. Students will learn about the lighting challenges for interior spaces and how to effectively meet them. The course teaches the basics of lighting layout, lighting terminology, and the lighting designer's role in the interior design process. Within the studio structure, students are expected to produce a complete lighting package, including a fixture schedule and reflected ceiling plan. Prerequisite: CID 1000 Introduction to Interior Design, or permission of Department Chair. The textbook will be necessary for the first class. "Interior Lighting for Designers" by Gary Gordon and Jim Nuckolls. Either the 3rd or 4th Edition are fine. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the undergraduate level as CID 3100. Students wishing to pursue undergraduate credit should register for the undergraduate section. This course is only offered during the Fall semester.

CID 6110. Materials, Methods, and Finishes. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the major materials available to designers and architects, including their structure, properties, potential expressive qualities, and their use. Students learn how to integrate materials into the design and construction of interior spaces. The course familiarizes students with the selection of appropriate materials for various uses based on function, aesthetics, safety, comfort, and maintenance. During the course of this class, students will gain an understanding of construction documents including both drawings and specifications. At times this course may be cross-tallied at the graduate level as CID 6110. Additional work required for graduate level credit is outlined in the course syllabus. This course is only offered during the Fall semester. Prerequisite: CID 1000 Introduction to Interior Design. It is also recommended that CID 3050 Autocad I or CID 6060 Revit I is completed prior to enrolling in this course.

CID 6250. Portfolio and Resume Design. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to Portfolio and Resume Design. It will focus on developing a "brand" for each student, which is represented on their resume, portfolio, business cards, and other material that may be used during a job search. The purpose of this "brand" will be to set the students apart from other aspiring designers entering the job market to aid them in obtaining a job. Students will incorporate work from previous studios and classes that they have completed to include in the portfolio. The final deliverables will be a professional resume, cover letter and portfolio. Prerequisites: CID 6050 AutoCAD II or CID 6060 Revit I, and a minimum of 2 Interior Design Studios.

CID 6800. Directed Studies: Interior Design. 3 Credits.

This option is appropriate for degree students who want access to independent faculty supervision, lab areas, and supplies for independent projects, and do not need or desire extensive course instruction. This option is justified only if 1) the project content cannot be covered in an existing course, 2) the student's department deems it of substantive value to the student's educational goals and interests, and 3) the project work will be done outside of regularly scheduled class time.All directed studies are for credit (one to three credits). Students cannot take more than three credits of directed studies per semester. Students enrolled in directed studies will have access to the facilities and equipment at times arranged by the instructor. To enroll, students must submit a Directed Studies Contract that is available at the Office of the Registrar and obtain written permission from the instructor and the chair or program director of the student's department and when different, the course department. The directed studies instructor will be responsible for working with the student to establish project goals, oversee progress, and determine final course grades. Bachelor's Foundation students and Continuing Education students are not eligible for directed studies. Under certain circumstances, directed studies may be pursued by graduate students by combining participation in an advanced undergraduate course with extra independent assignments at the graduate level, as arranged in advance with the directed studies instructor.

CID 6900. Internship: Interior Design. 3 Credits.

For degree students only. Internships can help students develop marketable skills, establish professional contacts, and explore different career options.

CID 7010. Interior Design Studio III. 3 Credits.

Studio 3 concentrates on the application of building systems and spatial identity as they relate to the interior environment. Students explore specific design contexts and examine the relationships between site, program, and method. A comprehensive project will account for lighting, material specification, FFE, building systems, and sustainable building methods. Refined methods of representation, documentation, and communication will be explored including the conventions of construction documents.

CID 7020. Interior Design Studio IV. 3 Credits.

In Studio IV, students coordinate their design process with input from multiple disciplines. Students conduct specialized research and develop personal philosophies to execute a comprehensive design project. Integration of lighting, FFE, building systems, and sustainable building methods are essential components of the final project. Students will be required to establish a refined method of communicating their design intent through an advanced concentration on representational techniques.

CID 7060. Interior Design Digital Applications III. 3 Credits.

The use of digital design technology to convey advanced design concepts. Methods of representation explored using digital modeling, rendering, and fabrication. The relationship between virtual and physical models.

CID 7100. Construction and Detailing. 3 Credits.

Detailing skills are central to the success of any interior design process. This course allows students to understand the methodology and practice of designing and drawing interior construction details in a built environment. Intensive study of the integration of materials will leave students with confidence in their ability to contribute to the preparation of technical drawings, and to provide drawing references for fabrication of design concepts. Pre-requisite(s): CID 3050 AutoCAD I, or permission of Department Chair. This course is only offered during the Spring semester.

CID 7200. Advanced Lighting Applications. 3 Credits.

In this hands-on advanced lighting studio students will gain practical experience with lighting drawings, fixture/lamp specifications and fixture installations. The course is project oriented with students working in teams on a range of projects such as lighting design concept development working from images to three dimensional spaces, and developing RCP light plans and specifications. The teams will then create working fixtures using found or everyday objects, create flashlight spaces, and participate in a Festival of Lights under the directions of the instructor. Prerequisite: CID 6100 Lighting Design or by permission of the Department Chair.

CID 7310. Advanced Digital Graphics. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to expand upon students' understanding of the fundamentals of computer-aided design through exploration of digital media. These explorations include systems of analysis, meaning of media, expression, syntactical, and spatial language. Students will focus on both two-dimensional graphic techniques/concepts and 3D modeling and image making techniques/concepts. Prerequisites: CDM 1200 Digital Design I (or equivalent experience), and CID 3050 AutoCAD I, CID 6060 AutoCAD II or CID 6060 Revit.

CID 7600. Selected Topics in Interior Design. 3 Credits.

Through a changing selection of design studios with instructors drawn from the professional design community, this studio will offer a broad range of topics from which students may choose during their course of study. The shifting nature of the subject matter of this studio intentionally allows for topical issues in the design community to be addressed. Topic varies each time it is offered. Limited to MA Interior Design candidates only.

CID 7800. Interior Design Pro-Thesis Seminar. 3 Credits.

Through a combination of research, writing and pre-design studies, students will formulate a thesis proposal for the final semester of study in the Master of Arts in Interior Design program. During this preparatory semester, students will document their research and experiences under the supervision of the instructor. This course is open to students enrolled in the Master of Arts in Interior Design program who have completed CID 7010 Interior Design Studio III; or by permission from the Department Chair. This course is only offered during the Fall semester.

CID 7900. Interior Design Thesis. 3 Credits.

The student is expected to work at a professional level in completing a comprehensive design project. Each student will undertake a rigorous exploration of a project of his or her own design and development, under the supervision of a thesis advisor. The process will culminate in a public review of the project with jurors drawn from the faculty as well as the professional design community. This course is only offered during the Spring semester.