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Viewing: PSPR 6223 : Public Opinion and Political Socialization

Last approved: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 09:21:35 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:17:09 GMT

College of Professional Studies
Professional Studies - Public Relations (PSPR)
PSPR
6223
Public Opinion and Political Socialization
Public Opinion & Political Soc
201501
3
Course Type
Lecture
Seminar
Default Grading Method
Letter Grade

No
No
PSPR 6201 and PSPR 6202
Corequisites

15
Ben Zingman Ph.D
Frequency of Offering

Term(s) Offered

Are there Course Equivalents?
No
 
No
Fee Type


No


The process by which people become engaged in public debates and politics; how they acquire and maintain attitudes, biases, and beliefs, and the decisions they make as a result. Discussion centers on the forces that influence public opinion and political socialization, including the power of the press and its impact on our major institutions.
Through this course, students will: • Develop awareness and critical thinking regarding the role, formation, measurement, and use of public opinion in contemporary U.S. public affairs and public relations. • Understand processes that shape opinion, political and marketplace behavior, and the role we play as communicators in engaging and influencing these processes. • Enhance critical thinking about when and how communications can and should be used to support or change public opinion. • Write a substantial analysis of how communications activities are utilized in the real world to influence opinions, attitudes, and behavior. • Enhance written communications skills.
Uploaded a Course Syllabus

Course Attribute


gharris (Fri, 23 Jan 2015 14:09:29 GMT): Rollback: Please review this version of the course description, which has been edited to reflect conventional length and "Bulletin" language: "The process by which people become engaged in public debates and politics; how they acquire and maintain attitudes, biases, and beliefs, and the decisions they make as a result. Discussion centers on the forces that influence public opinion and political socialization, including the power of the press and its impact on our major institutions."
mokeyc (Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:26:07 GMT): Rollback: See comment from academic affairs -- if you are Ok with this, then we can quickly send forward.
Key: 6661