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Viewing: PSYC 3180 : Seminar in Cognitive Science

Last approved: Mon, 23 May 2016 18:38:19 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 13 May 2016 20:12:10 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Psychology (PSYC)
PSYC
3180
Seminar in Cognitive Science
Seminar in Cognitive Science
Fall 2016
3
Course Type
Seminar
Default Grading Method
Letter Grade

No
No
PSYC 3118 or PSYC 3121 or PSYC 3122 or PSYC 3124 or PSYC 4106W or PSYC 4107W
Corequisites

19
Any of the cognitive neuroscience faculty: Dopkins, Kravitz, Mitroff, Rothblat, Philbeck, Shomstein, Sohn
Frequency of Offering

Term(s) Offered

Are there Course Equivalents?
No
 
No
Fee Type


No


Advanced seminar for undergraduate students focusing on recent developments in cognitive science. Topics vary and may include perception, attention, memory, representation, and cognitive control, as well as neural bases of cognitive processes.
(For a sample seminar on Attentional Selection and Cognitive Control): Students will be able to demonstrate how to synthesize cognitive theories and principles to interpret empirical research; how to apply principles of research methods to analyze the design of a study; how to evaluate the scientific contribution of an empirical research study. Students will develop scientific presentation skills as they lead the seminar discussion with the instructor as a moderator; the ability to actively participate in a sophisticated scientific debate; and the skills required to write a research proposal using APA style.
This is intended as an advanced, graduate-like seminar for majors who have a special interest in cognitive neuroscience and have already taken courses in the area. For these students, the course will explore a more focused topic in depth and will likely serve as good preparation for graduate work in the field.
Course Attribute

Note that the syllabus provided is an example of how one professor, Sohn, would do this course. It will differ in focus depending on who teaches but will be similar in format across professors.
Key: 10382